Note to Larry Silverstein re demolition of buildings

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Note to Larry Silverstein re demolition of buildings

Postby DeeJay on June 19th, 2013, 11:08 am

No need to bring in hijackers for the next demolition!
Use Japanese technology instead!!

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/18/science/tricky-ways-to-pull-down-a-skyscraper.html

This is an article in the Science section of the New York Times. It has a video clip imbedded, I tried to attach them seperately but was unable to. Interesting way to go about dismantling a building.
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Re: Note to Larry Silverstein re demolition of buildings

Postby Vext Lynchpin on June 19th, 2013, 5:54 pm

Here's a YouTube version of the video in question from the New York Times YT channel:


full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=97QqO2Mdi88
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Re: Note to Larry Silverstein re demolition of buildings

Postby fbenario on June 20th, 2013, 1:57 am

DeeJay wrote:http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/18/science/tricky-ways-to-pull-down-a-skyscraper.html

This is an article in the Science section of the New York Times. It has a video clip imbedded, I tried to attach them seperately but was unable to. Interesting way to go about dismantling a building.


From that article:
One thing is clear, Mr. Moore said: Implosion by use of precisely placed explosives would not be used, nor would a wrecking ball. Both methods are largely forbidden in New York because of safety and environmental concerns, although this month officials allowed the first implosion in more than a decade, of an old Coast Guard apartment building on largely isolated Governors Island.

(In general, although implosion makes for great YouTube videos, it is appropriate in fewer than 2 percent of projects, Mr. Duane said. It is also occasionally unsuccessful, as it was last month in Brisbane, Australia, when a concrete silo had to be delicately nudged over by an excavator after explosive charges left it leaning precariously.)

If implosion is really only appropriate in 2% of demolitions, it really does make one wonder what method was used on 9/11, when TPTB had to be certain the buildings would come down completely. Who knows. And by now who cares.
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Re: Note to Larry Silverstein re demolition of buildings

Postby Only2perCent on July 12th, 2013, 3:08 am

... it really does make one wonder what method was used on 9/11, when TPTB had to be certain the buildings would come down completely.


I thought the answer was obvious by now - MAKE A MOVIE!

The public did not see the process - only the result, and judging by the character of ruins, the factual demolition wasn't as perfect as was shown on television.
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Boo-hoo... Old Larry loses some money...

Postby DeeJay on July 19th, 2013, 7:39 pm

Article from the Christian Science Monitor

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Latest-News-Wires/2013/0718/World-Trade-Center-9-11-lawsuit-can-t-continue-says-judge

World Trade Center: 9/11 lawsuit can't continue, says judge

World Trade Center owners can't sue the airlines for the events of 9/11, a judge ruled Thursday. The World Trade Center owners have already received $5 billion in insurance payments, but sought $3.5 billion more from the airlines' insurers.

By Tom Hays, Associated Press / July 18, 2013

The moon rises over One World Trade Center, which stands where the World Trade Center twin towers once stood. Owners of the World Trade Center sought additional money from airlines' insurers for the costs of recovering from the 9/11 attacks and building One World Trade Center.

NEW YORK

The owners of the World Trade Center can't demand billions of dollars more in insurance money for the destruction caused by the Sept. 11 attacks, a federal judge decided Thursday.

Judge Alvin Hellerstein ruled after hearing testimony by economic experts for the trade center owners and for the airlines linked to the planes that were hijacked in the attacks. The non-jury trial was held to decide whether the owners could collect more than the nearly $5 billion they've already received toward reconstruction.

In ruling against developer Larry Silverstein and World Trade Center Properties, the judge cited state laws that bar "windfalls and double recovery on the same loss."

The judge said that though he was ruling against the trade center owners, they deserved credit for spearheading the recovery effort at the 16-acre lower Manhattan site.

"You were dealt a very severe blow," the judge said of the attack, which turned the trade center into an inferno and destroyed the twin towers. Since then, the developer's workers have labored to "create beauty out the ashes of the destruction," he added.

A spokesman for Silverstein Properties said the developer was "deeply disappointed" by the ruling and would appeal but remains committed to the ongoing construction projects on the site.

"We will not rest until we have exhausted every option to assure that the aviation industry's insurers pay their fair share toward the complete rebuilding of the World Trade Center," said the spokesman, Bud Perrone.

During the four-day proceeding, Silverstein's attorneys had insisted that the aviation companies owed at least $3.5 billion for letting hijackers board planes that destroyed three skyscrapers on Sept. 11, 2001: the prominent twin towers and 7 World Trade Center, a 47-story building that caught fire after debris from one of the jet crashes pierced its facade and collapsed hours later.

Attorney Roger Podesta, speaking for companies including United Airlines Inc., US Airways Inc., American Airlines Inc. and its parent company, AMR Corp., had argued that making aviation companies pay would amount to double compensation.

He said an $8.5 billion total recovery would be more than two and a half times the fair value of the buildings that fell.

But attorney Richard Williamson, representing World Trade Center Properties, said damages from the attacks had totaled at least $7.2 billion.

The trade center owners say it has cost more than $7 billion to replace the twin towers and more than $1 billion to replace the third trade center building that fell.
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