Suggested Videos and Reading

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SacredCowSlayer
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Suggested Videos and Reading

Unread post by SacredCowSlayer » Sat Nov 17, 2018 8:30 pm

[Admin Note by SCS: I think the suggestion (below) by our member ThisIsUnreal is well worth opening a topic for here in the Living Room. Thank you for that. :) ]
thisisunreal » November 17th, 2018, 1:49 pm wrote:Dear Simon and Patrik, with reference to the video of Tony Martin giving some extremely interesting opinions, I don't find it in the least surprising that I have never heard of his name. He describes the all too familiar discredit that is common to anybody who has ever looked at historians who have strayed too far from the beaten track! You will not find those authors easily in the same way that Clues Forum is very well hidden for those earnestly looking for truth.

With that said.....I wonder if Clues Forum members would be interested in compiling a 'reading list' or a 'suggested authors' list in order to help orientate people quickly and help people find the most compelling authors?
simonshack » November 14th, 2018, 10:28 pm wrote:Dear Patrik,

You justly linked to a speech by Tony Martin, a very little-known academic whose opinions - in my honest opinion - deserve to be heard, worldwide.

Image
According to Wikipedia, "Tony Martin died unexpectedly on January 17, 2013, aged 70".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Martin_(professor)

Please spend 1 hour (as I just did) listening to what Professor Tony Martin had to say - the wealth of details in his historical account of the particular "dynamics" behind the horrific slave trade (and more) is simply stunning - and something that we all need to be reminded of. Also, Tony Martin comes through as a totally honest person - and with a fantastically subtle and humorous talker talent :


full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uu0vQrZbhQo

Tony Martin's lucid speech is certainly relevant to this "Engineering Racism" thread - as viewed under a historical perspective.
Martin Luther King pales in comparison to this gentleman.

At 17:05 in this video, Tony Martin makes a quite priceless statement:

"I think that if one had to isolate a single tactic, it was a tactic of telling lies - they've elevated 'telling lies' to a very high, artistic form".

At 44:06 in this video, Tony Martin makes another priceless statement :

"Another tactic is, of course, their use of the major media. They become very agitated when one speaks of their control of the media - that's one of the most anti-semitic things that it is possible for anybody to say..."

You should not be surprised for never having heard of Tony Martin. -_-

SacredCowSlayer
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Re: Suggested Videos and Reading

Unread post by SacredCowSlayer » Fri Nov 23, 2018 3:33 pm

Our member “Smokey” sent me the following YouTube video a couple of days ago.

It’s just over 12 minutes long, and, “pound for pound,” it’s one of the more insightful videos I’ve come across that breaks down the difference between commonly used (and often misunderstood) terms such as Narcissist, Psychopath, and Sociopath.

She does an excellent job explaining the key difference between the latter two.

Aside from a passing reference to “serial killers” (not the subject of the video), it’s very good. I highly recommend it.

If you decide to watch it, please do not miss the last 3-4 minutes. She saves the best for last.



full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dv8zJiggBs

Altair
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Re: Suggested Videos and Reading

Unread post by Altair » Fri Nov 23, 2018 5:05 pm

I've recently read "Black Swan" and "Antifragile" by Nassim Nicholas Taleb. This statistic/mathematician/philosopher has a really good take particularly on economic issues and how the academy/Nobel/big-banking stablishment manipulates society and particularly economy and politics. Too much contents to summarize here, but the guy has really a very deep insight.

Mansur
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Re: Suggested Videos and Reading

Unread post by Mansur » Sat Nov 24, 2018 3:32 am

SacredCowSlayer » November 23rd, 2018, 4:33 pm wrote:Aside from a passing reference to “serial killers” (not the subject of the video), it’s very good. I highly recommend it.
Yes, and we have a good chance to meet her in a TEDtalk.

A really interesting account of her activity:
http://www.calstatela.edu/faculty/ramani-durvasula

- - - - - -

“Women are made to suffer,” – said a (female) character in the very short (about eight or ten normal page, so it’s shorter than the video) writing linked below.

So I recommend its reading; but before doing that I suggest some kind of strong box-ring or belt to apply to the belly.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23219/23 ... 3219-h.htm

[And a noteworthy description from an "analysis" of the story:
...Some readers interpret the process by which Putois gradually becomes a reality as a symbolic representation of how rumors spread in a community. Such readers see the story’s central theme as rumor-mongering, and Putois as a symbol for scandalous gossip or ugly rumor. Still other readers, noting that the story was first published while France was obsessed with the Alfred Dreyfus affair, have suggested that Putois symbolizes any forged or counterfeit reality, like the forged documents fabricated by the military to “prove” Dreyfus guilty, or the falsified history invented by the government to justify its claim that the spy in their midst had to be a Jewish officer of Alsatian origin. Such readers thus see “Putois” as a satirical parody of the Dreyfus affair, exposing it as a gross miscarriage of justice. However readers choose to characterize the central theme of “Putois,”—myth-making, rumor-mongering, or counterfeiting reality—they are clearly all seeing the same meaning in “Putois”: a humorous portrayal of the human need to find a scapegoat to explain away the experience of evil...
(Original highlights.)
http://wiseeunice.tistory.com/205 ]

SacredCowSlayer
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Re: Suggested Videos and Reading

Unread post by SacredCowSlayer » Sat Nov 24, 2018 3:41 pm

Mansur » November 23rd, 2018, 9:32 pm wrote:
SacredCowSlayer » November 23rd, 2018, 4:33 pm wrote:Aside from a passing reference to “serial killers” (not the subject of the video), it’s very good. I highly recommend it.
Yes, and we have a good chance to meet her in a TEDtalk.

A really interesting account of her activity:

. . .
Certainly, as with nearly anyone, the video I posted is not any kind of endorsement by me (SCS) of the person(s) in the video.

That said, my view is that the content of that specific video has generally helpful and insightful information about sick minds at “work.”

I will also add, my experience in dealing with people (that are full blown sociopaths) is quite consistent with the behaviors and characteristics described in the video.

___________________

Readers (and members) in the future should consider my approval (above) of a given video or piece of literature to be qualified just the same.

I don’t lend my brain over to persuasion (let alone control) by any sort of guru. There are gems of information that often come from a variety of sources.

The key is to learn how to use discernment, and sort the information in a critical, yet constructive manner.

Regards,

Flabbergasted
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Re: Suggested Videos and Reading

Unread post by Flabbergasted » Sat Nov 24, 2018 5:24 pm

SacredCowSlayer wrote:There are gems of information that often come from a variety of sources.
Yes, fragments of truth can be found in the most unexpected places. I remember an amusing passage from a book by Richard Bach in which he belittles his guru´s teaching for being too plain-sounding:
Richard: “You are quoting Snoopy the Dog, I believe?”
Don: “I’ll quote the truth wherever I find it, thank you.”

patrix
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Unread post by patrix » Thu Dec 06, 2018 4:45 pm

A video on cognitive bias that popped up in my YouTube flow that was actually good



full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEwGBIr_RIw

patrix
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Re: Sending TYCHOS to Astronomy Institutions

Unread post by patrix » Thu Dec 13, 2018 5:19 pm

Tychos for sale in a book and jewellery store

Image

Regnbågens Böcker & Smycken

Haga Nygata 11, 413 02 Göteborg
031-13 33 75

https://g.co/kgs/ZKz6XS

SacredCowSlayer
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Re: Suggested Videos and Reading

Unread post by SacredCowSlayer » Thu Dec 13, 2018 6:10 pm

That is fantastic dear Patrix! Even better than Astronomy Institutions in my opinion.

I hope you don’t mind that I moved your post here. Admittedly, the books adjacent to it sort of caught my attention as well, and I figured, hey, let’s put this in the “Suggested Reading. . .” Topic.

Disclaimer: I don’t know anything about those other books contained in the image. Just piqued my curiosity is all.

Feel free to move it back if you wanted it in that TYCHOS topic for some particular reason. :)

Sincerely

simonshack
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Suggested Videos and Reading

Unread post by simonshack » Thu Dec 13, 2018 7:50 pm

patrix » December 13th, 2018, 5:19 pm wrote:Tychos for sale in a book and jewellery store

Regnbågens Böcker & Smycken

Haga Nygata 11, 413 02 Göteborg
031-13 33 75
https://g.co/kgs/ZKz6XS
Wonderful, dear Patrik ! This is hoping that someone in that store will forsake jewellery for my book! :P

For those who don't live in Göteborg, here's where you can order my TYCHOS book online (remember, folks - its xmas time):

Image

http://www.lulu.com/shop/simon-shack/th ... 42858.html

Alternatively, you can read the book (and view my graphics at highest resolution) by subscribing to https://www.tychos.info/

This is currently my best suggestion for xmas reading. :)

patrix
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Re: Suggested Videos and Reading

Unread post by patrix » Thu Dec 13, 2018 8:03 pm

simonshack » December 13th, 2018, 8:50 pm wrote: This is currently my best suggestion for xmas reading. :)
Likewise Simon. :) A colleague going away on a Christmas vacation that I gave a copy told me he's bringing it with him. Hopefully we have another one who gets it when he comes back in January.

@SCS: It's an "Alternative" store. Crystals, yoga and stuff. But the nice lady in the store bought two copies on the spot and wanted my number to get more if they sold out. I was floored since I had gone by some regular book stores that gave various contrived reasons to not buy the book or let me have them on display for a 50% cut

And it's a bit ironic indeed that the title of the shelf where she filed Tychos is "Quantum physics etc". But what the heck, we got to start somewhere. :)

patrix
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Re: Suggested Videos and Reading

Unread post by patrix » Sat Dec 22, 2018 7:25 am

Some old books on astronomy I found

http://physicsdatabase.com/2014/01/18/1 ... omy-books/

An interesting passage from the first book on the list (page 127, my emphasis):
Finding the Velocity of Light by Experiment.—Light travels from one part of the universe to another with inconceivable rapidity. Light is not a substance, because experiment proves that darkness can be produced by the addition of two portions of light.
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/35261

A simple and clear proof that light cannot be particles. Waves can cancel each other out. Particles can't.

Edit: The explanation for aberration of light (in the same book at page 140) becomes interesting in light of the above (no pun intended). It's explained using raindrops and snowflakes, which are not comparable if light is a wave (to which I agree).

ICfreely
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by ICfreely » Fri Feb 15, 2019 10:05 am

[Admin Note (SCS): I moved this post here, since it is interesting, but doesn’t clearly have a place elsewhere.]

I’m posting the following here because I don’t know where else to post it.

On February 8th Niahm Harris of NewsPunch reposted a “miracle cure” Gregg Prescott article on “Holistic” Cancer Research.

(https://newspunch.com/the-suppressed-me ... mond-rife/)

The Suppressed Medical Technology Of Royal Raymond Rife
by Gregg Prescott, M.S.

Cancer cure genius Royal Rife silenced by medical mafia

Dr. Royal Raymond Rife, known as the father of holistic cancer research, was silenced by medical mafia.

Born in 1888, Royal Raymond Rife was an American inventor known for his belief that he could observe and render inert a number of viruses which he thought were causal factors in several diseases, most notably cancer.

His Rife machine can destroy infectious organisms, viruses, bacteria and fungus and has been used to eliminate more than 50 different microorganisms including cancer, tuberculosis, strep and leprosy.

Holistic Cancer Research reports: Rife began research cancer in 1922, but it took ten years before he was able to isolate the VX Virus, which was a cancer microorganism. A year later, Rife invented the Universal Microscope, which a light source technology that could magnify an object 60,000x its size. Because of his invention, Rife was the first person to see a live virus.



Question: In an age where technology can be used to improve the quality of life for everyone, why has the Rife machine been ridiculed by the medical industry and suppressed for so long?

Answer: The last thing Big Pharma cured was polio. <_< There is no money in repeat business when finding a cure to anything.

http://www.holisticcancerresearch.com/h ... chine.html

I sincerely hope CF’s readership is, at this point, immune to this sort of $chitt.

sharpstuff
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Re: Suggested Videos and Reading

Unread post by sharpstuff » Sun Dec 20, 2020 10:58 pm

Here is a link to the writing which is posted below: Political Systems Through the Lens of Chaos Theory

[Note:] This [below] was done in the Soviet Union, albeit within the constraints of ideological censorship, not to mention a futile economic model and a barbaric totalitarian regime. However, state sponsored sciences and humanities did yield their fruits.

Thoughts & translations by Dmitry Fadeyev

Political Systems Through the Lens of Chaos Theory
A brief sketch

Society is a dynamical system, its constitution, the interrelationship between all of its members, is always changing, always evolving, which means that a political system of governance can never settle down to a static set of rules. Atop a fluid world of men an ideal state is impossible, for as long as men live old formations must become obsolete.

Almost Intransitive Systems and Strange Attractors

“History never repeats itself, but it rhymes.” Mark Twain
The original source of the quote is uncertain, however, it is generally attributed to Mark Twain.

Edward Lorenz, a mathematician meteorologist and pioneer of chaos theory, describes almost intransitive systems as: “systems of equations possessing solutions which behave in one manner for an extended period of time, and then change more or less abruptly to another mode of behavior for an equally long time.” Such systems possess something called strange attractors, points towards which the system is drawn, but never meets. A picture makes this concept instantly graspable. Below is a diagram of the Lorenz attractor, a chaotic system that revolves around two poles, alternating at seemingly random intervals and never following any single path twice:

The Lorenz attractor
Image
Image source: Wikipedia

If we think about society as a dynamical system, then political systems of governance must fluctuate between different attractors, just like the loops in the Lorenz diagram above. Furthermore, because the system is chaotic, because it is always changing, the political system will never fully suit its society—in time it will become obsolete, and the system will swing towards a different orientation. History shows this in the shifts between traditional and radical governments, between conservatives and liberals, between the individual and the collective, between atheism and religion. In a milder form, perhaps a sub-fluctuation of the above, Western governments continually shift between more socialist, more liberal parties and the more traditional, more conservative ones. No single orientation lasts because over time its form of governance grows unsatisfactory to a portion of the population. In more extreme cases, the form of governance decays and is thrown off via a revolution.

The Butterfly Effect and the Great Man Theory

Sensitive dependence on initial conditions—colloquially known as the butterfly effect—is a term used to describe systems that can have wildly different outcomes arising from minute changes in their variables. Here are two Lorenz attractors whose initial x-coordinate differs by a mere 10−5. While the trajectories at first are alike, they soon begin to diverge considerably.

Two slightly different Lorenz attractor orbits:
Image
Image source: Wikimedia Commons

The great man theory was a 19th century idea popularized by Thomas Carlyle, who wrote that “the history of the world is but the biography of great men.” The theory holds that through their wisdom and energy great men can shape the destinies of their countries and the world. This was contested by men like Herbert Spencer who considered great historical figures to be the products of their time. It is the problem of agency: do great men shape the world, or are they simply the products of historical movements?

If we consider society as a dynamical system with a sensitive dependence on initial conditions then the impact of great men can resonate and amplify through time, considerably affecting historical trends. While all individuals are undoubtedly shaped by the zeitgeist of the world into which they are born, their actions may have a profound effect on the political system—perhaps not changing its essence, but redirecting it towards another strange attractor, another political orientation—e.g. radical to traditional, conservative to liberal, and so on.

Antifragility and the Remaining Constant

What are the implications of the idea that there can never be a perfect government for the design of political systems? One suggestion can be found in Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s concept of antifragility. Taleb suggests that the antonym of fragile is not resilient, but antifragile. Something that is fragile is harmed or destroyed by change, something that is resilient is able to withstand it without itself changing, but something that is antifragile actually gains and grows stronger from change. An example of antifragility in the body can be demonstrated by weight lifting—straining your bones and muscles (up to a certain point) by lifting something very heavy damages them in the short term, but they respond by growing stronger. In the world of markets antifragility is demonstrated by options—reserving the right to buy or sell shares in the future at a set price. Without market fluctuation, you lose a little by paying for the cost of the options, but with large market jumps you stand to gain a lot.

The implications on political theory are as follows: large, centralized, bureaucratized governments are fragile because they put everyone in danger at times of change. For example, an interconnected global banking system affects most of the globe, so a collapse caused by garbage mortgage bonds in the United States cascades around the world, causing a major international financial crisis. In a decentralized system an individual problem does not drag everyone down. This is how evolution works across a species: those least adapted to their environment die, but the rest survive and pass on their genes to the next generation, in turn better adapting it to the changing environment. Planned economies, like that in the Soviet Union, grind everything to a halt, taking down the whole system when large shocks are introduced (e.g. a fall in the price of a national resource like crude oil).

Another thing to consider: if political systems keep changing, what remains constant? The answer is the indivisible unit from which they are composed: the citizen. Political work, if it is to have a lasting impact, must focus on that constant, must focus on developing, strengthening, and enlightening human minds and souls. Science, philosophy, literature, art—the tools for the expansion of one’s mind and the enlargement of one’s soul, and, furthermore, the tools for the projection of human soul through time—i.e. for the creation of a culture that will nourish those born into it with its ideas and its art, replicating itself in their minds and in turn letting them extend it forward into the future. If the development of man stagnates, or even decays, then the next shift in political orientation will leave the world without the talent to make the most of it, setting back its evolution—the difference between the American Enlightenment and the Dark Ages.

From Rules to Processes

“I teach you the overman. Man is something that shall be overcome. What have you done to overcome him?”
Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra

Chaos theory analogies need not be taken further. The point here is to recognize the chaotic nature of political forms of government atop a dynamical system—i.e. the instability of political systems and the impossibility of ever achieving equilibrium. The implication of this idea is to rethink how we think about governments: from sets of rules and static constitutions that aim to create a perfect utopia, to processes: fluid constructions that shift and evolve over time—constructions that incorporate change into their design. One such construction is the free market, which divides risk across a myriad of businesses, each of which succeeds or fails individually, providing an optimal system of satisfying consumer demand. On the other hand, large, centralized, bureaucratized systems—systems that try to resist change—will inevitably collapse, and the damage caused by the collapse will be dictated by their size. By creating such monoliths we are fragilizing ourselves and setting ourselves up for costly recessions, depressions, and revolutions.

Lastly, in a world of constant change, lasting change can only be gained through the development of ourselves—our minds, through science and philosophy, and our soul, through literature and art. Today this task is relegated to the level of the individual, who does not and will not seize it in the world of perpetual consumerist distraction. If this is raised to the level of society, considerable gains may be achieved, and must be achieved if we are not to expand our species into space while simultaneously contracting our minds into oblivion. As Nietzsche wrote, man must be overcome.

October 2017
Looking for a good read?
Proust wrote that the true voyage of discovery is not to visit strange lands, but to possess other eyes, to behold a hundred universes that each of them beholds. Thus, in the words of Ruskin, what good books give us is not mere knowledge, but sight.

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