The Electricity supply.

Global War deceptions & mass manipulation, fear-mongering terror schemes and propaganda in the Age of the Bomb

Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby Seneca on March 8th, 2017, 5:40 pm

scud » 07 Mar 2017, 19:53 wrote:
It does seem to me an insane idea to try to perfectly balance generation with demand as the official story goes. One possibility would be to have something in the middle, that the generation is constantly powering up, and the demand is constantly using a portion of.


Yes, this to me is the crux of it. That demand is instantaneous but supply is anything but. Not a problem though if you have adequate storage (batteries of some type) as this would provide a buffer between supply / demand which could be easily monitored and replenished as required. Thus negating the need to waste fuel when it’s not needed whilst always on hand to deliver a reliable supply and of course negating the need for a national grid control room constantly battling (as we have seen) to keep the supply almost perfectly matched to whatever the general populace seem to be in the mood for consuming.
It’s very much like the mains water supply without reservoirs, lakes, towers (storage facilities) and expecting a regular pressure to emerge from the tap.

We're told that demand is actually quite predictable but I really wonder about this. Certainly from personal experience my electricity bills vary enormously from quarter to quarter. They are never what I expect (apart from ‘Ghaaaaar!...to ‘What in the name of the Lord almighty, you f*****g bastards’) which shows that just our own household consumption isn’t predictable at all, but over the place.

If Hermann Plauson is right, are you sure that you need storage? It seems to me that he considers the atmosphere itself as a store of electricity. Like a huge battery where you can plug in by building a big tower.
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Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby scud on March 8th, 2017, 8:22 pm

Hello rusty. Yes I’ve thought about this and it certainly gets a mention (together with a pretty picture) in the video I linked to in the opener concerning the national grid control centre.. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vX0G9F42puY (from about 5.30 in).

The particular station that they’re talking about as being ‘almost like a battery’ is this..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkIzKGot0Ss

..which according to the narration is able to go from zero to full power in 75 seconds. Fairly impressive but my kettle goes from zero to 1.5Kw at a flick of the switch.
There’s also a couple of tidbits of info’ here about thermal stations that I found interesting and hadn’t picked up on wiki and the like. The narrator says @4.45 that a thermal station “can take anything up to 12 hours” to get up to speed from cold or 45 minutes from standby. ‘Standby’ they officially term as ‘hot spinning’ where coal / gas is being burnt, Uranium isotopes fissioned, whatever, to produce a head of steam but no actual generation of electricity results..just ready to clutch it into the generator I guess. What a terrible waste!
Then of course we’d have to ask how they achieved ‘balanced supply’ before pumped storage, err and come to think of it, before NASA type control rooms.

Hi seneca.
Yeah, there’s no mention of batteries with the case of professor Plauson. My only guess is that he wasn’t conducting his experiments in terms of supplying electricity to households and industry, rather just the source and possibly other methods of harnessing it. However, the few areas of info’ concerning AE suggest that it isn’t a constant (there seems to be some consensus as to a huge difference between winter and summer) and if this were the case then you could envisage some kind of storage system being necessary.
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Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby aa5 on March 9th, 2017, 5:08 am

rusty » March 8th, 2017, 5:04 am wrote:
scud » March 7th, 2017, 6:53 pm wrote:Yes, this to me is the crux of it. That demand is instantaneous but supply is anything but.


I'm not an expert in that area, but it looks like pump storages are the solution to your problem. In times of excess energy they consume more than they produce. Sounds like a suitable method for balancing the energy supply with the current demand.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pumped-st ... lectricity


Pumped storage could be useful for that function, and especially for providing power when needed in periods of peak demand or when another power station goes offline. However pumped storage electric generation capacity only accounts for 2% of the US electric capacity.

https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=11991

Hydroelectric dams can also be used to store energy, by lowering the flow of water through the dam in times of low power demand, while keeping the natural gas and coal plants going, and thus building up water behind the dam. Hydroelectricity not including pumped storage accounts for ~8% of US generation capacity.

https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=2130
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Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby Seneca on March 9th, 2017, 3:04 pm

scud » 27 Feb 2017, 00:15 wrote:As many of us know, during or shortly after electrical storms the power supply is often disrupted, but where Arron lives (Koh Samui Thailand, I believe) he says that the lights go out each and every time a nearby thunderstorm occurs. He speculates that this is because lightning temporarily deprives the local atmosphere of charge...all grounded through the conductive conditions of a storm, therefore whatever capacitance this relatively small island possess is quickly depleted by the demand of the residents and cannot be replenished until the weather changes for the better.
Now, if the island wasn’t powered by atmospheric energy and was indeed wholly reliant upon some off-shore, ex dinosaur combusting power plant with sea bed interconnects of chunky copper cable as claimed one would not expect this to happen, ever...yet it does, every time (been there and experienced it myself).

I have never experienced it, but thunderstorms can disrupt the power supply not only on small islands. Maybe this is a good way to investigate if they are hiding something.
When you experience a disruption after a thunderstorm you could track down the official explanation and investigate it. Because you were directly harmed, you have every right to get an explanation. If they say a tree fell on a power line go look for the tree. If they say it is some malfunction ask what they are going to do to make sure it doesn't happen again and ask proof that they effectively do something.
One alternative explanation for the blackouts is that they deliberately shut off parts of the grid to balance the demand with a decreased production. That is in line with what the guy in the National Grid video was saying: "From this room, we control all the electricity, generation and demand."
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Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby scud on March 9th, 2017, 9:22 pm

So this is China during the 1920’s. You can clearly see the electric transmission lines..
https://www.liveleak.com/view?i=b85_1489033049

I had the privilege of visiting just after the boarders were first tentatively opened to tourists in 1979 and let me tell you what a ‘shocker’ of a strictly controlled ‘government guided tour’ it was. Filth, deprivation and ‘unworldliness’ that I shall never forget. Yet 60 years prior to this with supposedly no contact whatsoever with the Western world they have coal fired power stations with some form of ‘national grid’ to balance the system?
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Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby pov603 on March 10th, 2017, 9:02 am

I remember many years ago being at an exhibition where the formwork for the spiral water chamber was on display and they were proclaiming the virtues of the skill of the carpenters who made it with such precision rather than the 'power' it helped bestow on the population.
But now, after reading this thread, isn't the repumped water powering the turbines essentially implying that TPTB have perpetual motion insofar as they must use less energy to re-pump the water than it produces in order for it to be worth operating?

Edit: typo/grammar
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Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby scud on March 10th, 2017, 11:16 am

Hi pov.
No ‘perpetual motion’. The story according to national grid is that electricity is cheap at night (though why it’s cheaper to burn stuff after the sun goes down I’m not entirely sure). Anyway, they use this ‘cheap’ nighttime electricity to power the water turbines in reverse in order to push the water back uphill...they reckon it’s somewhere in the region of 75% efficient, or in other words a 25% loss.
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Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby Seneca on March 10th, 2017, 1:11 pm

Nobody says it’s cheaper to burn stuff after the sun goes down.
The explanation is that there is less demand for electricity. It is not economical for most power stations to shut down, they prefer to lower the price.
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Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby patrix on March 10th, 2017, 4:08 pm

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/ ... r-its-free

More playouts by the Nutwork on this subject. I smell a rat, but have no idea where. Could battery tech be subverted? If was possible to efficiently store produced energy, the demand for Nutwork oil and coal would decrease. Are they now deciding to spearhead something they have suppressed until now – Efficient battery technology?
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Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby Skinnylegsandall on March 10th, 2017, 7:41 pm

Miami,Fl summertime primary loads on 7620 volts,as distribution circuits,carry as much as 800 but not more primary amperes with the sag on the wire approaching 30 inches with relatively high resistance on the wire certainly creating higher base fees.Primary capacitors,giant batteries mounted on poles.are used as needed farther down line as voltage begins to drop.Works like a charm.
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Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby scud on March 13th, 2017, 11:10 am

Probably just coincidence.. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/ene ... -business/?

Part of the gist here by one of our ‘big six’ suppliers (sponsored puff piece by the DT on behalf of E.ON) is that..‘yeah, we need storage to alleviate the stress of those poor buggers at national grid control room, frantically turning on and off colossal power stations to match peoples tea making habits’. So of course we need the genius of our old pal ‘Elon Musk’ to come up with some workable ‘solutions’.
_________________

Skinny, you think these things are ‘capacitors' rather than the official ‘transformer’ explanation?

Image

Just observational but if these large canisters were full of copper windings about an iron core (transformer) then it would weigh an enormous amount. I know because here in the UK it is a regulation that the voltage used for on site construction work must be stepped down from 230v to 110v with something like this...

Image

...a little box measuring 205mm L 240mm W and 265mm high yet it tips the scales just short of maximum baggage allowance at 18Kg.
I dunno, just guessing but I’d say that if these things are what they say they are then the weight would be something along the lines of your average family car...strapped to the top of a tall wooden pole?
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Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby Skinnylegsandall on March 13th, 2017, 12:56 pm

What I see there is a standard transformer on a pole,note the 45 on tx,that distribution wire above the transformer is something like 5000 primary volts,maybe slightly more,that goes into the transformer and steps it down to whatever house voltage used where you are.I see wire coming out those three bushings(hot leg,hot leg neutral),that transformer will easily weigh 450 to 550 fifty lbs,around the windings in the entire transformer is filled high grade oil,feels good on your face..What is standard house voltage where you live that would be the number coming out of transformer.I see nothing to indicate otherwise.
That blue box to me looks like it a trouble call small temporary tx to isolate a transformer and see if the voltage is out or bad somewhere maybe underground.We change these transformers out using all sorts of lifting devices double shear blocks standing on the pole. derrick trucks etc etc.
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Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby scud on March 13th, 2017, 8:01 pm

Skinny. Do you work as a ‘lineman’? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nw3WIb71SAA
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Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby Skinnylegsandall on March 13th, 2017, 8:28 pm

For a very long time,a lineman yes,right up until I had a widow maker heart attack,as the morning progressed major life saving open heart surgery 30 months ago.
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Re: The Electricity supply.

Postby scud on March 18th, 2017, 10:19 pm

Over on the Nuke Hoax thread, Simon recently posted this little jewel of a 1950‘s film by General Electric.


full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gi-ItrJISQE

‘Nobody has ever seen an atom’...but they exist because we have experts that say they exist. Not only that, we can tell exactly their make up including numbers of protons, electrons, neutrons etc.

8.44 in caught my particular attention, a possible ‘wink, wink’ as to what this energy stuff is really all about?
A pile of ‘Uranium 238’ bearing an uncanny resemblance to the pyramids of Giza complete with a removed and glowing capstone depicted as ‘Uranium 235’?

Image

Image
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