Einstein and other gods of science

Historical insights & thoughts about the world we live in - and the social conditioning exerted upon us by past and current propaganda.

Re: Einstein and other gods of science

Postby pov603 on November 27th, 2016, 7:24 am

"Subsequent studies with large particle accelerators have now led us to understand that space is more like a piece of window glass than ideal Newtonian emptiness. It is filled with 'stuff' that is normally transparent but can be made visible by hitting it sufficiently hard to knock out a part."

[Emphasis added]
Is that it then? 'We' now understand?
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Re: Einstein and other gods of science

Postby Anders on November 27th, 2016, 9:12 am

aa5 » November 27th, 2016, 7:17 am wrote:One place I think they get confused is they talk about a light wave like it is something separate from the aether. Eg.. like a physical thing travelling through water. But I view it like after an earthquake in the ocean, a force wave is travelling through the water. But that wave of force from the earthquake is not a physical thing. It is pushing the individual molecules of water, which then push the molecules next to them, and so on.

Nassim Haramein, and alternative researcher, has said that it's the space that is the stuff of particles. One new thing I have learned on this forum is that even alternative science researchers can be controlled opposition. But I think Haramein is correct, that particles are vortices in and of space. And propagation of a particle through space is similar to the wave on an ocean analogy.
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Re: Einstein and other gods of science

Postby Anders on November 27th, 2016, 9:17 am

pov603 » November 27th, 2016, 7:24 am wrote:
"Subsequent studies with large particle accelerators have now led us to understand that space is more like a piece of window glass than ideal Newtonian emptiness. It is filled with 'stuff' that is normally transparent but can be made visible by hitting it sufficiently hard to knock out a part."

[Emphasis added]
Is that it then? 'We' now understand?

Notice that the Nobel Prize winning scientist still clings to Einstein's relativity (the full quote includes more references to relativity than I posted). And the top scientists no doubt know that Einstein's relativity is a hoax. But they are stuck with the hoax! They have to become gatekeepers against their own will, because otherwise the mainstream scientific community will reject them, and they will become poor and homeless.
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Re: Einstein and other gods of science

Postby Kham on November 27th, 2016, 9:26 pm

Einstein was a varied and prolific writer.

The lists below are some of the names of the papers Einstein has published. The list demonstrates that Einstein was somewhat varied in subject matter as an author. I often wondered if he was given other scientists patents and ideas to rewrite and to possibly put the 'correct' spin on because it is hard for me to imagine that for such technical papers, that Einstein would have time to conceive of, reconsider, write several drafts of and then write those papers all himself, even if co authored in such short time spans. The mental time needed for each paper take times to develop. I know PhD's who have spent years on one just one paper.

Some papers written by Einstein:
On a Heuristic Viewpoint Concerning the Production and Transformation of Light
On the Motion of Small Particles Suspended in a Stationary Liquid, as Required by the Molecular Kinetic Theory of Heat
On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies
Does the Inertia of a Body Depend Upon Its Energy Content?
Thermodynamic fluctuations and statistical physics
Principle of relativity.
Photon and Quantum
Einstein solid
Old quantum theory
Wave–particle duality
Critical opalescence
Zero-point energy
History of general relativity
Principle of equivalence,
Theory of relativity, and
Einstein field equations
Hole argument
Gravitational waves
Cosmology
Schrödinger equation
Bose–Einstein statistics
Stress–energy–momentum pseudotensor
Classical unified field theories
Wormhole
Einstein–Cartan theory
Einstein–Infeld–Hoffmann equations

What Science says Einstein got wrong:
Superconductivity
Special relativity
Gravitational waves
Black holes
Quantum mechanics
EPR paradox
Cosmological term
Minkowski's work
Heisenberg's work
Unified field theory

Einstein was a prolific writer. Below you will find how many papers Einstein published per decade. Lot's of his papers were co authored but still, the list rivals Miles Mathis. I think I remember reading how prolific Einstein was as a writer here at CF but I couldn't find the post to link to it. I wanted to finish that thought and show the statistics. All my data is from the official party line: Albert Einstein Wiki

1901-1910 . . . 58 papers published
1911-1920 . . . 91 papers published
1921-1930 . . . 73 papers published
1931-1940 . . . 30 papers published
1941-1955 . . . 20 papers published

At his most prolific, Einstein published 24 papers in one year, 1905, smack dab in the middle of his years working at the Swiss Patent Office which was from 1902 to 1909. Einstein was an information machine.
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Re: Einstein and other gods of science

Postby Flabbergasted on January 24th, 2017, 8:00 pm

These excerpts from the essay “Science: Pro and Con”, by G. K. Chesterton (The Illustrated London News, October 9th, 1909) criticize the modern-day glorification of science and bovine confidence in "canonized" scientists like Einstein and Hawking.

[...] For what we have suffered from in the modern world is not in any sense physical knowledge itself, but simply a stupid mistake about what physical knowledge is and what it can do. It is quite as obvious that physical knowledge may make a man comfortable as it is that it cannot make a man happy. It is as certain that there are such things as drugs as that there are no such things as love-potions. Physical science is a thing on the outskirts of human life; adventurous, exciting, and essentially fanciful. It has nothing to do with the centre of human life at all. Telephones, flying-ships, radium, the North Pole are not in the ultimate sense good, but neither are they bad. Physical science is always one of two things: it is either a tool or a toy. At its highest and noblest, of course, it is a toy. A toy is a thing of far greater philosophical grandeur than a tool; for the very simple reason that a toy is valued for itself and a tool only for something else. A tool is a means, a toy is an end [...].

[...] The only evil that science has ever attempted in our time has been that of dictating not only what should be known, but the spirit in which it should be regarded. It does not in the least matter whether we look at a lamp-post or a tree as long as we look at it in a certain spirit. It does not in the least matter whether we talk through a telephone or through a hole in the wall so long as we talk sense. But we must not ask the lamp-post in what spirit it ought to be regarded. If we do, we shall find it as deaf as a post. We must not ask the telephone what we are to say to it. If we do, we shall find the young ladies at the exchange somewhat sharply insensible to the pathos of our position. Science must not impose any philosophy, any more than the telephone must tell us what to say. If we are going on a great and just adventure, it will be all the more glorious to go on a flying-ship. But we must not stop in the middle of the adventure to ask the flying-ship what a just adventure is. If we are rushing to get married, it may be thrilling to rush in a motor-car; but we do not ask the motor-car whom we shall marry. Generally speaking, we hardly even ask the chauffeur. That quite elementary and commonplace principle suffices for all the relations of physical science with mankind. A man does not ask his horse where he shall go; neither shall he ask his horseless carriage; neither shall he ask the driver of his horseless carriage; neither shall he ask the inventor of his horseless carriage. Science is a splendid thing; if you tell it where to go to [...].
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