Engineering 'disease'

Historical insights & thoughts about the world we live in - and the social conditioning exerted upon us by past and current propaganda.

Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby ICfreely on August 29th, 2016, 4:59 am

As someone who does weights and is looking to build muscle it's imperative to get enough protein to aid recovery and put on size - I simply couldn't get enough protein if all I were eating was fruit.



Shane, are you familiar with the "Blood-Type Diet"? If so, what's your estimation of it?


3 Reasons To Avoid The Blood-Type Diet
By Marie Spano
Last updated: Apr 09, 2015


For starters, it has no basis in science or reason. Learn how the fit-minded should eat instead.

Eat Right For Your Blood Type, a book by Dr. Peter J. D'Adamo, isn't a nutrition work for Twilight fans. The author's concept, simply put, is that everyone can and should follow an optimal diet according to whether their blood type is A, B, AB, or O.

It all sounds very scientific, doesn't it, in a nerd-glasses-and-lab-coat kind of way? You know there's some 23-year-old actress out there waiting to offer a gushing endorsement of this diet as the cure for everything that ails everyone on Earth.

Indeed, we're all born with a different set of genetics, which we know contributes to our risk for some diseases and other medical conditions. To eat in a manner that coincides with our genetic makeup, while improving our health? Makes perfect sense, right?

The problem is, unless you recoil from garlic and sleep in a coffin, the so-called blood-type diet kind of, well, sucks.
The good doctor believes that certain foods are good for your blood type, and that others are dangerous. Eat foods from the latter category, and you may experience a variety of health issues, ranging from inflammation and bloating to a slower metabolism and even diseases such as cancer. Or so the book says.

Blood Type Specifics

Here's how he breaks down the dietary specifics for each blood type:

O = "old" or ancient times

• Is intolerant to dietary and environmental adaptations
• Lean meats, poultry, fish
• Restrict grains, legumes
• Responds best to stress with vigorous exercise
• Requires an efficient metabolism to stay lean and energetic

A = "agrarian"

• Has a sensitive digestive tract
• Vegetarian diet
• Tolerant immune system
• Adapts well to settled dietary and environmental conditions
• Responds best to stress with calming actions and gentle exercise
• Requires agrarian (based on agriculture) diet to stay lean and productive

B = "nomadic"

• Has a tolerant digestive system
• Can tolerate the most flexible dietary choices
• Low-fat dairy, meat, produce
• Avoid wheat, corn, lentils
• Responds best to stress with creativity
• Moderate exercise
• Requires a balance between physical and mental activity to stay lean and sharp

AB = "modern"

• Has a sensitive digestive tract
• Avoid chicken, beef, pork
• Should eat seafood, tofu, dairy, most produce
• Responds best to stress spiritually, with physical verve and creative energy
• AB is an evolutionary mystery


Eat Right For Your Blood Type gives you portions of the best foods listed for you. It also lists foods that encourage both weight gain and loss for each blood type. He also offers case examples, answers common questions, and addresses different situations that might arise (food allergies, diseases etc.) for each group.

Why This Diet Isn't For You

Unfortunately, the book raises more questions than it answers. I've singled out three reasons in particular why this diet isn't necessarily for you:

1 The Diet is Short on Science

The recommendations made on Bodybuilding.com are based on science and experience. The take-home:

1. Eating small, healthy meals throughout the day will help control hunger and manage insulin levels, giving you a constant source of energy.
2. Getting enough quality protein will ensure that you are building a lean-yet-muscular physique.
3. Using the right supplements in the right doses at the right times will support your overall health and training program. Though Eat Right for Your Blood Type sounds scientific, it's anything but.

2 The Diet Isn't Individualized

At first glance, Eat Right For Your Blood Type seems individualized-it zeros in on your blood type. However, it doesn't take into account your medical history, medications, current or target body weight, food likes and dislikes, food allergies or intolerances, diet history, and more. The ideal dietary approach for you should account for all of these factors.

3 The Diet Does, Bizarrely, Account for Ethnicity

In the Eat Right For Your Blood Type diet, foods are portioned out differently based on your ethnicity. There's no rhyme or reason for doing this.

Though Eat Right For Your Blood Type isn't a harmful diet, it also isn't based on any science; therefore, there's no guarantee or even a suggestion that it will work for you. You'll be better off learning from the articles on Bodybuilding.com and taking your own situation into account to create a plan that meets your specific needs.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/3-reasons-to-avoid-the-blood-type-diet.html
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Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby pov603 on August 29th, 2016, 10:21 am

I've read one of Peter D'Adamo's books and have cut out chicken from my diet and reduced the amount of tomatoes that I ingest.
Cutting out the chicken has definitely helped my digestion [or lack thereof] of this type of meat though I have not noticed much from reducing [but not eliminating] tomatoes.
The fact that there is a 'type' of blood would, to my mind, lead one to accept the possibility that certain things ingested will be dealt with differently by peoples of different blood groups.

Edit: changed probability to possibility!
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Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby aa5 on August 29th, 2016, 7:38 pm

ShaneG » August 28th, 2016, 12:26 pm wrote:I clicked the link to that forum but no topics were showing up.

Could you please expand on why eating a predominately fruit based diet is healthier than other diets?

There's a lot of information out there regarding nutrition so it's tough to know what is best, and it would be helpful to know more about this frugivore lifestyle before considering it as a serious choice of diet.

I juice my vegetables in the morning, and usually eat a banana before doing exercise, as I've heard it's better to juice veg and eat fruit. I've also heard that you shouldn't mix different types of fruit in the same meal for digestion reasons.

As someone who does weights and is looking to build muscle it's imperative to get enough protein to aid recovery and put on size - I simply couldn't get enough protein if all I were eating was fruit.


Same here when I went to that forum, it looked pretty dead, but I could have the wrong settings chosen.

Why I dismissed the frugivore diet out of hand on first hearing it, was that I could not be filled up on fruit alone - and I don't even weight lift, although I do walking/light hiking. The guy I first saw promoting a frugitarian diet was a nutcase(imo) who only ate fruits & vegetables, and was thin and looked relatively healthy/excellent mental ability, but he had next to no muscles on him.

Since I always read labels after dieting and keeping an eye on calories, I found a bunch of non-animal sources of protein. For nuts there is Hazelnuts, Cashews, Walnuts, Peanuts etc(I buy mixed bulk ones that have dried fruits mixed in). Then there is peas & chickpeas which are loaded with protein. Then all the beans, and also smaller seeds.

Eg.. Wikipedia says 1 cup of peas has 0.6 grams of fat, 21 g of carboyhydrates (7 of which are fibre) & 8 g of protein.

and chickpeas, have 39grams of protein per 1 cup.
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Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby ICfreely on August 29th, 2016, 10:14 pm

The fact that there is a 'type' of blood would, to my mind, lead one to accept the possibility that certain things ingested will be dealt with differently by peoples of different blood groups.



A great culinary artist is, at heart, an alchemist! :)


Anyhow, everyone should know their 'blood type.'


Why should I know my blood type?

Besides the risk of receiving an incompatible blood type when a transfusion takes place – which can lead to a clumping of blood cells that can be fatal – knowing your blood type is especially critical for pregnant women. If a woman is Rh-negative and pregnant with an Rh-positive baby, the condition is known as Rh-incompatibility.

The mixing of blood of an Rh-positive baby with a mother who is Rh-negative can produce antibodies that can affect future pregnancies and even cause a fatal outcome for the fetus. When a mother is found to be Rh-negative, she is usually given an immunoglobulin that prevents antibody production and sensitivity.

Other advantages of knowing your blood type: you may need a transfusion, you may wish to become a blood donor.

http://www.healthtestingcenters.com/blood-types.aspx



P.S.

Fancy this.

There is no coat of arms on the flask, but somewhere in one of Britain's hospitals a convalescent patient has some of the world's most exclusive blood flowing through his or her veins. The regal donor of the precious stuff was Prince Charles, 36, who has become the first member of the royal family ever to give blood, in his case, O Rh-negative. The unprecedented puncturing of royalty was to reassure Britons after a nationwide scare about AIDS caused a drop in donations. At the North London Transfusion Center, the Prince was asked whether he was homosexual, injected drugs into his veins or had had sex with anyone in those two groups. After those regulation indignities (and his negative answers), he had an apprehensive question of his own: "Is it going to hurt?" When the pint was finally drawn, Charles pretended to apologize because his blood was not blue: "I'm afraid it's red like anyone else's." Fancy that.

TIME magazine (Mar. 18, 1985)
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Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby HonestlyNow on August 31st, 2016, 1:04 pm

ShaneG » August 28th, 2016, 4:26 pm wrote:
I clicked the link to that forum but no topics were showing up.

One must be registered to use the forum. It's free.

ShaneG » August 28th, 2016, 4:26 pm wrote:Could you please expand on why eating a predominately fruit based diet is healthier than other diets?

Dr. Morse explains this in his videos.

ShaneG » August 28th, 2016, 4:26 pm wrote:As someone who does weights and is looking to build muscle it's imperative to get enough protein to aid recovery and put on size - I simply couldn't get enough protein if all I were eating was fruit.

Again, Dr. Morse explains this in his videos. Protein is another 'psyop', so to speak. We don't need a high-protein diet; in fact, such a diet is detrimental to our health and is putting millions of people into such unhealthy states that they run to the allopathic gods running around the lands for relief. They won't get more than temporary relief, if any, from allopathy because they (allopathic doctors) don't understand how the body works as a whole. They are educated, but they haven't learned truth.
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Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby aa5 on August 31st, 2016, 4:29 pm

A few years back I had had enough of eating a high protein diet for digestive reasons/bloating, so for the next 6 months I purposefully ate a low protein diet. I didn't notice any difference in muscle mass. Granted I was not weight lifting. Personally I believe that assuming a person gets some small minimum amount of protein, that the muscle mass is mainly determined by genetics/hormones.

When I went to the gym all of the guys who were both heavily muscled and not fat, were hardcore steroid users.

I find the diet I feel the best on, is high sugar, low protein, low fat. As much as I like the mixed nuts/fruit mix, I rapidly gain weight on it. And my digestion is not as good, which I can tell as I get bloated/feel fat & slow.
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Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby simonshack on August 31st, 2016, 5:03 pm

*

May I kindly remind everyone that this thread is titled 'Engineering disease' - and is therefore dedicated primarily and specifically to the major shenanigans / and mass-deceptions perpetrated by the Big Pharma corporations.

Let us not turn this forum into yet another diet-counseling place - there are countless other forums dedicated to such issues.

Thanks!

ps (and FWIW): I drink lots of water and eat almost everything (in reasonable amounts) that smells good - and am still fit and alive! -_-
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Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby HonestlyNow on August 31st, 2016, 10:49 pm

simonshack » August 31st, 2016, 12:03 pm wrote:May I kindly remind everyone that this thread is titled 'Engineering disease' - and is therefore dedicated primarily and specifically to the major shenanigans / and mass-deceptions perpetrated by the Big Pharma corporations.

As such, that is exactly what allopathy does — invents diseases (and then only allowing licensed persons to "treat" these inventions) when there is no such thing as "diseases", only acidosis (an overly acidic body) and a stagnant and congested lymphatic system (the sewer system of the body). They treat symptoms of acidosis primarily with the products of Big Pharma.
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Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby Farcevalue on August 31st, 2016, 11:12 pm

simonshack » August 31st, 2016, 12:03 pm wrote:*

May I kindly remind everyone that this thread is titled 'Engineering disease' - and is therefore dedicated primarily and specifically to the major shenanigans / and mass-deceptions perpetrated by the Big Pharma corporations.

Let us not turn this forum into yet another diet-counseling place - there are countless other forums dedicated to such issues.

Thanks!

ps (and FWIW): I drink lots of water and eat almost everything (in reasonable amounts) that smells good - and am still fit and alive! -_-


Would it be fair to say that the "food pyramid" fits the category of psyop and may be seen as an example of the shenanigans perpetrated by those that benefit from it?
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Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby sharpstuff on September 1st, 2016, 4:14 am

Simon wrote:

May I kindly remind everyone that this thread is titled 'Engineering disease' - and is therefore dedicated primarily and specifically to the major shenanigans / and mass-deceptions perpetrated by the Big Pharma corporations.

Let us not turn this forum into yet another diet-counseling place - there are countless other forums dedicated to such issues.

Thanks!


******
Dear Simon,

As instigator of this thread, I was about to make a similar comment. Thank you for this input.

Farcevalue wrote:

Would it be fair to say that the "food pyramid" fits the category of psyop and may be seen as an example of the shenanigans perpetrated by those that benefit from it?

Exactly, especially as they (food pyramids) change to suit some current flavour. One might also mention the stupid references to 'calories' and the notion, apparently, that one can count them before eating them. When I was more than half a century younger, a 'calorie' was a unit of measurement, not a quantity of food.
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Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby aa5 on September 4th, 2016, 5:46 pm

One way of engineering disease, is to change the definition of the disease over time. Let us say a specific disease affects 1 in 1,000 people, which means in an area of 500,000 people, there will be ~500 people who have the specific disease.

But our corporations & government agencies want to grow and grow the funding going towards them. If we could say change the definition of the disease so that it now encompasses 1 in 100 people - we would now request 10 times the funding in order to treat this burgeoning patient population. Of course we couldn't do this in one year, as it would be too obvious. But we could subtly change the definition over say 20 years, and then be living it up as ever more funding flowed to us to handle all of these new patients.

Each year as all of these disease definitions are being expanded, medical insurance premiums & taxation levels to fund public health care, must be increased at well above the rate of inflation - in order to pay for treating all of these new patients.
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Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby ICfreely on September 21st, 2016, 4:40 pm

simonshack » August 31st, 2016, 8:03 am wrote:*

May I kindly remind everyone that this thread is titled 'Engineering disease' - and is therefore dedicated primarily and specifically to the major shenanigans / and mass-deceptions perpetrated by the Big Pharma corporations.

Let us not turn this forum into yet another diet-counseling place - there are countless other forums dedicated to such issues.



I see. Very well, my liege, as you wish!


The Cure of Imperfect Sight by Treatment Without Glasses - W. H. BATES, M.D. (1920)

On a tomb in the Church of Santa Maria Maggiore in Florence was found an inscription which read: "Here lies Salvino degli Armati, Inventor of Spectacles. May God pardon him his sins."

Nuova Enciclopedia Italiana, Sixth Edition.

http://visionsofjoy.org/pdfs/BatesPerfectSightWG.pdf



For those not inclined to read a 300+ page book I offer:


Improve Your Eyesight Naturally with Eye Exercises

You may be able to get rid of your glasses and improve your vision problems such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, and light sensitivity with these eye exercises.


By Michael Drake
July/August 1983

Today, more than ever, inappropriate response to stress is being cited as a primary cause of many ailments that plague modern humanity. Whether it's caused by environmental, cultural, or psychological factors, anxiety can lead to a great number of mental and physical problems. Indeed, recent research indicates that stress is a major contributing factor in disorders of the eye as well.

Such findings can have wide-ranging implications. After all, at least half of the population in the United States currently wears prescription glasses or contact lenses. Furthermore, possibly as many as 70% of Americans have visual problems of which they're not even aware. In a sense, you might say that good eyesight is no longer normal!

Yet, very few folks are born with visual abnormalities. For the most part, defective eyesight is acquired. If that's so, can poor vision be corrected? According to studies done by Dr. William H. Bates, a distinguished New York ophthalmologist who pioneered in the field of visual training, you can dramatically improve your eyesight naturally, without glasses or contact lenses!

What is Visual Training?

In the past, most vision experts worked from the theory that the eye is able to focus on varying distances solely because it can change the shape of its lens, and that most seeing problems are due to a permanent deformation of the eyeball and lens. However, contrary to these widely held beliefs, Dr. Bates's research has indicated that the whole eye, not merely the lens, adapts itself to focusing by means of the muscles of the eyeball. When habitual tension and strain tighten them, then, a sight dysfunction may occur, and teaching these uptight muscles to relax, through a program of visual training eye exercises, can remedy many seeing disorders.

It should be noted here that few eye professionals support this theory, and even fewer offer visual training to their patients [ :o ]. Most eye specialists continue merely to prescribe the wearing of corrective lenses for refractory errors, which—in effect—encourages the eyes to maintain abnormal vision by allowing them to become permanently adjusted to a constant degree of error.

Practitioners of the visual training method suggest, however, that a person gradually decrease the amount of time spent wearing corrective lenses during the day, and that fundamental eye exercises be performed (without wearing glasses or contacts) to lessen dependency on mechanical aids.

The purpose of this article is not to debate the merits of the Bates stance against those of standard practices, but simply to present the ideas of visual training advocates so that readers who wish to can try out this lesser-known health care option for themselves. Consequently, the following information offers strictly the Bates school's point of view.

The following techniques, then, are based on these premises: First, that the art of seeing—like other fundamental skills such as talking, walking, and using one's hands—is acquired. Second, this skill is normally learned through unconscious self-instruction in childhood. Third, for many of us in today's pressure-packed world, the only way to keep perfect sight is to practice techniques of conscious eye relaxation. Finally, if the exercises are performed correctly for a sufficient length of time—in conjunction with a proper diet and a physical conditioning program—eyesight will improve permanently. (The corollary to this is that the stronger the lenses you wear now—and the longer the time that you've worn them—the more time and effort you'll have to put forth to achieve better vision.) All right, let's begin.

Palming

It's best to "palm" while sitting or lying on the floor, with your elbows propped on a cushioned surface. Close your eyes and then cover them with the palms of your hands, crossing the fingers of one hand over those of the other on your forehead. Don't, however, apply any pressure on the lids with your palms. Ideally, you'll "see" a field of intense blackness, which indicates a state of perfect relaxation. If instead you witness illusions of light, bright color, or patches of gray, you're tense to some degree. However, don't concentrate on trying to "see" blackness, as the effort itself will produce strain. Rather, passively visualize a pleasant memory—one that helps ease your mind—while keeping your shoulders and neck relaxed. The more frequent and lengthy the periods of palming, the more likely you are to school your eyes to reduce muscle tension, with subsequent benefit to your sight.

Swinging

This whole-body exercise improves vision, relieves fatigue and stress, and increases the mobility of the eyes. Stand looking straight ahead, with your feet positioned about 12 inches apart. Now, rotate your body—head, trunk, and all—to the left, throwing your weight onto your left foot while you allow your right heel to rise from the floor. Keep your shoulders and neck straight. When you swing to the opposite side, shifting your weight to your other foot, your eyes will cover a 180° arc. Absolutely no attempt should be made to focus your sight on anything. Just maintain an attitude of passive relaxation, making about 30 of these "arcs" per minute. You should do this exercise twice daily, completing the swing from side to side 100 times. By doing your swings right before bedtime, you'll prevent eyestrain from occurring during sleep.

Blinking

Cultivate the habit of frequent, effortless blinking. This performs two vital functions: It lubricates and cleanses the eyes with tears, and it rests and relaxes the eye muscles.

Sunning

Although there's no scientific evidence available to prove that sunning helps vision, many people who have tried it testify to its benefits, particularly those whose eyes have become oversensitive to light. (EDITOR'S NOTE: See the sidebar for a first person account—by one of MOTHER'S former editors—of using these techniques to solve her problem of light sensitivity.)

All sunning should be done with the eyes closed. Sit or stand in the sunlight, face relaxed, and let the rays of the sun penetrate and ease the tension in your eyelids. This is a good way to start off the day, and even a few minutes will help. To avoid possible strain on your eyes, rotate your head slightly from side to side or move it as if you were using your nose to draw a circle around the sun, breathe deeply and don't squint.

Central Fixation

Central fixation refers to the fact that—since the central portion of the retina is the point of most acute vision—the eye sees only one small part of any object sharply, with all the other areas being slightly blurred. When you look at a thing, your eye shifts very rapidly over it to achieve the illusion of clearly seeing the entire object at once. To demonstrate this fact, look at an object, focusing on its topmost part. Without actually moving your focus downward, try to "see" the bottom of the object. You'll find that its lower details don't appear to be sharp.

A problem-free eye shifts quite rapidly and unconsciously while it is observing. People with imperfect vision often try to see a large part of the visual field at once, all areas equally well simultaneously, without moving their eyes. This puts considerable strain on the eye, and also on the brain, the organ that actually has to integrate what you see.

To correct this tendency, it's important to develop your central fixation by teaching your eyes that it's "acceptable" to see only one point clearly at a time. The orbs must learn to move and refocus rapidly, rather than straining to see an entire object at one sighting. You can do this by studying an eye chart, training yourself to look at the top of a letter on the chart while "accepting" an unfocused image of its bottom (and vice versa). When you can accomplish this easily, your eyes will be relaxed, and your vision will be improved.

Shifting

Loss of vision is often realized in direct proportion to loss of eye motion. Therefore, rapid eye-shifting is beneficial in all cases of visual difficulties, most notably, in nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, and squint. In contrast to the last exercise, now force your eyes to make a series of small-scale shifts, consciously trying to sense and perceive the various sections of an object, without gazing fixedly at it to see all of its parts clearly at once.

Actually, all of the exercises mentioned will—by relaxing the muscles and reducing strain—improve a person's eyesight, no matter what the particular affliction. However, there are a few more activities that can be done to improve vision, which focus on several of the more common eye problems.

Myopia

The most prevalent of all visual defects, myopia (commonly known as nearsightedness) is almost invariably an acquired condition. The cause is often thought to be emotional, and usually is the result of strain. For instance, schoolchildren are sometimes compelled to perform tasks that they may find boring or pointless. This, along with competition, anxiety, peer pressure, and fear of authority figures, may cause the mental stress that promotes myopia, and also occurs whenever the eye looks at anything that's unfamiliar. On the other hand, when it sees a known object, it shows no evidence of making extra effort. So, focusing on an object to which you're accustomed just prior to looking at an unfamiliar one will help reduce your visual tension.

Certain techniques can be used to help decrease myopia. For instance, try placing a calendar on the wall and sitting down in front of it, at a distance from which the numerals are barely legible. Remove your contact lenses or glasses (if you're wearing them) and "palm" your eyes. Then practice reading each number, at first closing your eyes momentarily before looking at it. (Your eyesight is always best when your eyes are first opened, and visualizing each numeral beforehand increases your ability to perceive the figure clearly when you do look at it.)

Now, read each figure on the calendar with both eyes, and then repeat the process while alternating eyes (cover the resting one with an open palm as you work). If one of your eyes is weaker, work with it more. Practice this exercise at least 15 minutes per day. In addition, try moving your chair back a foot or two each time you perform this exercise.

Your sight should improve considerably over the course of a few weeks.

Along with that, work on rapidly changing your focus from near objects to more distant ones and back again. (Recreational sports such as tennis, table tennis, and billiards can help.) And, of course, don't forget the fundamental exercises previously discussed: palming, swinging, blinking, sunning, central fixation, and shifting.

Hyperopia and Presbyopia

While myopics are unable to see objects clearly at a distance, people who suffer from hyperopia or presbyopia are unable to focus readily on objects close to their eyes. (Hyperopia is the condition of farsightedness in children which often persists into adulthood, while presbyopia is the farsighted condition that many persons experience when they reach middle age.) The basics that we've previously discussed are all beneficial in dealing with these vision problems. The calendar exercise mentioned in the section on myopia is also applicable, if you incorporate the following changes:

Use a pocket calendar and place it about 14 inches from your eyes, or else close enough so that you can only barely read the numbers. Shift your gaze from side to side over an individual numeral without attempting to focus on it. Next, close your eyes momentarily and visualize that number before focusing it in. Repeat this procedure for each numeral on the calendar, using both eyes first, then alternating eyes. (You'll probably want to work your weaker eye more.) It's best to practice this exercise at least 15 minutes a day, moving the calendar an inch closer to your eyes every few days.

Here again, the act of rapidly changing the focus from distant objects to near ones and back again can also be very beneficial.

Astigmatism and Squint

If your eyes are seeing blurred images and distorted shapes, you—like many others probably suffer from astigmatism (a focusing disorder caused by a misshapen lens). This malady is common to almost every other visual malfunction, and it occurs independently as well. Relaxation exercises will greatly relieve this condition. Squint is the inability of both eyes to look in the same direction at the same time to produce a single image. (A person with this condition is called "cross-eyed".) Although severe cases usually require professional treatment, less serious "squinters" can improve their sight by performing the following drill in addition to the basic techniques.

To do this exercise, you'll need to sit facing a blank wall, holding a ruler or yardstick vertically with the narrow edge forward, about 12 inches from your nose. Blink as you look up and down the straightedge half a dozen times, and then—without moving your head—look up and down the wall the same number of times. (When your eyes are focused on the distant surface, there will seem to be two of the rulers.) Alternate between the yardstick and the wall for about three minutes, increasing that time every few days. And remember to "palm" before and after each drill.

Finally, walking along a plank or balance beam in all directions—forwards, backwards, and sideways—is also beneficial for both squint and astigmatism.

Preventive Measures for Sure Sight

Even if your vision is already 20/20, there are probably some activities in your life that could eventually affect the way you see if you don't take proper precautions. Reading books and watching television are two examples of potential eye strainers.

When you read, try to sit in a relaxed position, holding your head upright. Keep the book parallel and at a comfortable distance from the eyes (generally 12 to 16 inches for most folks). Read each word in sequence, avoid staring, and blink at least once or twice while scanning each line. Use good lighting, but don't have it so bright that it causes a glare on the paper. Temporarily change your focus every few pages by pausing to glance about the room or to look out of a nearby window. Also, avoid reading when you're sick or very tired.

When viewing television, keep the room softly illuminated. Don't stare continuously at the screen. Instead, keep the eyes shifting from one point to another, and look away from the set occasionally to focus on another object. Be sure to close your eyes from time to time, blinking frequently, and position yourself at least ten feet away from the television screen.

Most of us rely on our vision to supply 80% to 90% of the information we process about the world. Our sight affects the way that we think and, in addition, the way we think affects our sight. (If you don't believe the latter statement, just remember that you actually see the world upside down, but your mind "inverts" the images so that they make sense!) Taking good care of this dominant sense organ, then, is obviously important. Will a regimen of eye-training exercises help you do that, and even improve defective vision? There's only one way to answer that question for yourself. Try itand see!

http://www.motherearthnews.com/natural-health/improve-your-eyesight-naturally-zmaz83jazshe.aspx
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Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby ICfreely on September 21st, 2016, 11:52 pm

Some people roll their eyes at the thought of curing their sight via simple exercises and opt for quick fix magic bullet technological 'solutions' like LASIK.


Quality of life study
In October 2009, the FDA, the National Eye Institute (NEI), and the Department of Defense (DoD) launched the LASIK Quality of Life Collaboration Project (LQOLCP) to help better understand the potential risk of severe problems that can result from LASIK[86] in response to widespread reports of problems experienced by patients after LASIK laser eye surgery.[85] This project examined patient-reported outcomes with LASIK (PROWL). The project consisted of three phases: pilot phase, phase I, phase II (PROWL-1) and phase III (PROWL-2).[87] The last two phases were completed in 2014.

The results of the LASIK Quality of Life Study were published in October, 2014.[86]

Based on our initial analyses of our studies:

Up to 45 percent of participants, who had no visual symptoms before surgery, reported at least one visual symptom at three months after surgery.

Participants who developed new visual symptoms after surgery, most often developed halos. Up to 35 percent of participants with no halos before LASIK had halos three months following surgery.

Up to 30 percent of participants with no symptoms of dry eyes before LASIK, reported dry eye symptoms at three months after their surgery.

Less than 1 percent of study participants experienced "a lot of" difficulty with or inability to do usual activities without corrective lenses because of their visual symptoms (halos, glare, et al.) after LASIK surgery.

Participants who were not satisfied with the LASIK surgery reported all types of visual symptoms the questionnaire measured (double vision/ghosting, starbursts, glare, and halos).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LASIK#Quality_of_life_study



Caveat emptor…


Gholam A. Peyman, MD recipient of National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement, bestowed by the President of the United States, President Obama, on America's leading innovators [2][3] and a Hall of Fame[4] of Ophthalmology and retina surgeon who is also a prolific and successful inventor. Gholam Peyman is a member of National Academy of Inventors and has, thus far, been granted 174 US Patents[5] covering a broad range of novel medical devices, intra-ocular drug delivery, surgical techniques, as well as new methods of diagnosis and treatment. His most widely known invention to date is LASIK eye surgery,[6] a vision correction procedure designed to allow people to see clearly without glasses. He was awarded the first US patent for the procedure in 1989 (link to image of patent, below). In addition to the numerous other honors and awards he has received (please see section 4, for Publications and awards), in 2005 he was selected by a ballot among the more than 30,000 ophthalmologists around the world to become one of the thirteen living ophthalmologists inducted into the Hall of Fame of Ophthalmology.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gholam_A._Peyman


Life and career
Peyman was born in Shiraz, Iran. At the age of 19, he moved to Germany to begin his medical studies. He received his MD at the University of Freiburg in 1962. He completed his internship at St. Johannes Hospital in Diusberg, Germany in 1964 and at Passaic General Hospital in Passaic, New Jersey in 1965. Peyman completed his residency in ophthalmology and a retina fellowship at the University of Essen, Essen Germany, in 1969 and an additional postdoctoral fellowship in retina at the Jules Stein Eye Institute, UCLA School of Medicine in Los Angeles in 1971. Peyman held the position of Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the UCLA School of Medicine from 1971 and served as Associate Professor and then Professor of Ophthalmology at the Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, University of Illinois at Chicago during 1971-1987.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gholam_A._Peyman#Life_and_career



Another (Iranian-born) ps-eye-god bites the dust! B)
ICfreely
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Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby aa5 on September 22nd, 2016, 6:09 am

When I was young, people who found themselves having trouble focusing their eyes, were given 'corrective glasses'(blacked out glasses with a bunch of holes punched through them, cost $5). These glasses are like hitting the gym for your eyes and after a few days wearing them, normal vision was regained.

Since I saw people use these corrective glasses, and regain normal focus a few days later - the industry is going to need a helluva good reason for why they are not using those corrective glasses today.

What always confuses the issue with health, is that for every ailment, there is a small % of people who do need treatment beyond 'hitting the gym'. For those folks, modern medicine can make a huge positive difference in their lives.
aa5
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Re: Engineering 'disease'

Postby MrSinclair on September 25th, 2016, 2:32 am

A friend of mine repairs musical instruments and had a customer high up the Harvard Medical Faculty. The Doctor told him this in a moment of candor. He said that doctors listen to a patients issues and make their best guess as to which medicine might help. If the problem goes away while taking it, that medicine is credited with the cure. If it doesn't work they try something else and maybe something after that. Meanwhile most things simply run their course and people heal irrespective or which or any medicine. Essentially he admitted that most everything they prescribe is merely guesswork and not the reason why people get better.
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