The CORONAVIRUS circus

Anything on the news and elsewhere in the media with evidence of digital manipulation, bogus story-lines and propaganda
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fakeologist
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS circus

Unread post by fakeologist » Tue Apr 28, 2020 11:20 pm

Sadly, your comment, like probably everyone's, only shows up for you.
I suspect they used the ghost setting to avoid a negative PR landslide.
https://imgur.com/gallery/9kCSz58

mnew9
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS circus

Unread post by mnew9 » Wed Apr 29, 2020 4:05 am

U.S. doctors Dan Erickson and Artin Massihi give a refreshingly honest press conference on April 22nd detailing their findings surrounding this false pandemic. They also reveal that many physicians are being pressured to classify illnesses and deaths as being related to Covid-19, whether they believe that to be true or not.
Of course, the doctors have since been 'discredited' by the media and authorities.This video was originally taken down by You Tube for giving 'misinformation' to the public.

full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FI9DJACegSA

kickstones
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS circus

Unread post by kickstones » Wed Apr 29, 2020 5:19 am

Yes, I just read about that on ZeroHedge news platform and apparently the video had 5 MILLION VIEWS, no wonder they pulled it.

YouTube Censors Viral Video Of California Doctors Criticizing "Stay-At-Home" Order

https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/youtu ... home-order

Daniel Horowitz

@RMConservative

Is it just me or did @YouTube take down Dr. Erickson's viral video with 5 million views?
YouTube at 🏠 ‎@YouTube

HonestlyNow
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS circus

Unread post by HonestlyNow » Wed Apr 29, 2020 12:52 pm

mnew9 wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 4:05 am
Of course, the doctors have since been 'discredited' by the media and authorities.
For me, they've been 'discredited' precisely because they advocate the following:
-1- testing before 're-opening' the economy
-2- that the 'officials' did the right thing by 'closing' the economy to begin with.

Under no circumstances is it okay to violate individual liberties.

anonjedi2
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS circus

Unread post by anonjedi2 » Thu Apr 30, 2020 1:05 am

HonestlyNow wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 12:52 pm
For me, they've been 'discredited' precisely because they advocate the following:
-1- testing before 're-opening' the economy
-2- that the 'officials' did the right thing by 'closing' the economy to begin with.

Under no circumstances is it okay to violate individual liberties.
Agreed. Not to mention the fact that they're recommending vaccines.

heniek1812
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS circus

Unread post by heniek1812 » Thu Apr 30, 2020 1:08 pm

HonestlyNow wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 12:52 pm
mnew9 wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 4:05 am
Of course, the doctors have since been 'discredited' by the media and authorities.
Under no circumstances is it okay to violate individual liberties.
But they will come at us in limiting where we can enjoy those "individual liberties". Want a drivers license, give us some of you "liberties". Want to get on a plane, we need some of your "liberties". .....

I suspect that is how the game will be played.

Petrov86
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS circus

Unread post by Petrov86 » Thu Apr 30, 2020 7:24 pm


smiley
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS "CRISIS" - as reported in the press

Unread post by smiley » Fri May 01, 2020 6:08 am

This is the direction we are headed:


https://youtu.be/8St5km2sPVc

Horribly dystopian if you ask me. :wacko:

glg
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS circus

Unread post by glg » Fri May 01, 2020 2:42 pm

We are just actors, extras in their games – that’s nothing new.
They create the game for us and we suffer the world stage.
No more surprises, no deviating from the plot, the timing is set way in advance and we better adhere to schedule.

Recently the World Food Programme Chief warned of a hunger pandemic as the moronavirus spreads. The World Bank followed suit, speaking of being alarmed about food security and covid-19
https://www.wfp.org/news/wfp-chief-warn ... ty-council
https://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/agri ... d-covid-19

But don’t they know that this is part of the circus, the follow up gig and has been accurately predicted to start in 2020 by game developers akin to Event 201 back in 2015?

It was called Food Chain Reaction: A Global Security Game.

Brace yourself – I found this a few days ago:


full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wfvtD17G9w

Here’s some more:


I was just in time to have a look at their website foodchainreaction.org, to see that John Podesta played a prominent role in setting up this game, but just a couple of days later that account was down/suspended.

heniek1812
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS circus

Unread post by heniek1812 » Fri May 01, 2020 8:55 pm

glg wrote:
Fri May 01, 2020 2:42 pm
We are just actors, extras in their games – that’s nothing new.
They create the game for us and we suffer the world stage.
No more surprises, no deviating from the plot, the timing is set way in advance and we better adhere to schedule.


I was just in time to have a look at their website foodchainreaction.org, to see that John Podesta played a prominent role in setting up this game, but just a couple of days latter that account was down/suspended.
Amazing how well they were able to clean out traces of this website on WayBack. One place they did not is "CASHED" in Google search. I would have never guessed this Podesta vampire would be involved in something like this. These orgs must be some type of training centers to prepare the right people to know what buttons to push when a Staged Play goes Pompeo Live. They do all this so called work "preparing" and when something happens it looks like there is nothing prepared. So obviously they are preparing for something other than what is Publicly stated.
Serious cooperation on issues like food security, climate change, and environmental preservation serves all of our interests
November 16, 2015
Food Chain Reaction Team
Food Security, Game Day
Food Chain Reaction put the fate of the world’s food supply on the shoulders of 65 private and public sector leaders. The players were transported to the year 2020 and a burgeoning global food security crisis. Over the course of two days, they collaborated, negotiated, and played out how the world would respond over the next ten years. The biggest takeaway was how their individual decisions could set off a chain reaction of effects in halls of government, boardrooms and communities around the globe.
But in reality, food security is no game. The players were passionate about how they will carry forward the lessons they learned through the game to real life. That call to action was echoed in a keynote address by John D. Podesta, founder of the Center for American Progress, one of the partners responsible for Food Chain Reaction. His remarks energized players, reminded them of the urgency to find solutions, and encouraged them to continue to find innovative ways to solve this critical global issue.

Remarks by John D. Podesta
November 10, 2015 | Washington, DC
It is really a pleasure to be here.
First, I want to thank you all for joining the Food Chain Reaction and giving us two full days of your time, your attention, and your expertise. We know how busy you all are – you’ve come from all parts of the world to do this – and the fact that you’ve all come here demonstrates the importance of the issues you’ve grappled with over the course of the game.
I’d like to thank the people who worked so hard to make this event happen. This exercise was the product of a remarkable collaboration by experts across a really diverse coalition of organizations – including the WWF, CNA, Cargill, Mars, of course the Center for American Progress, and many others who came together to put this on. CAP’s first effort at gaming the effects of climate change started in 2008 when we brought together again a similar collaboration to think about the direct effects of climate change and what policy needed to change, both here in the United States and globally. I think it had a direct impact, I can say that as someone who ran President Obama’s transition, and many of the people who participated in that game have had a role in participating in the Obama Administration. I think the teachings, the learnings, the experience gave them the ability to really contemplate these global scenarios – a really important step in being able to plan and move policy forward. Indeed, I think the accomplished and diverse group of people gathered here tonight is a testament to the growing importance of the food security as a challenge for policymakers worldwide.
You spent your time grappling over the last couple of days with crises that the world is already confronting, and that are likely to be more frequent, and potentially more devastating, as I’m sure you experienced. The cascading crisis in our global food supply chain: water shortages, food scarcity, price disruptions, all combined with population growth and political instability— these are the ruptures that can truly shake societies and governments.
So let me be clear, social disruptions can be traced directly to at least the acceleration that comes from climate change. Globally, 9 of the 10 warmest years on record have occurred this century. July was the hottest month in what has so far been Earth’s hottest year on record. I don’t need to explain to the people in this room how the added stress of climate change will come to bear on our global agricultural system, on our stressed out oceans, and on the billions of people they support.
Here in the United States, we lost 9 million acres to wildfires this year alone. In the past 3 decades, ocean acidification has cut in half the number of corals covering the Great Barrier Reef. I could go on and on. The scientific news just keeps pouring in.
This week, the World Meteorological Organization reported that average levels of carbon dioxide exceeded 400 parts per million in early 2015. That’s an increase of 43 percent over pre-industrial levels. Again, in the spring as the Northern forest began to take some of that carbon, it dipped below 400 parts per million, but they are fully expecting that coming into the new year we will see the carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere exceed 400 parts per million and stay there.
In a separate report just hours later, the Met Office and Climatic Research Unit at Britain’s University of East Anglia reported that the Earth’s average temperature has crossed the symbolically important 1-degree Celsius warming mark, with temperatures over the first nine months of 2015 surpassing historic norms by exactly 1.02 degrees Celsius. I think these reports only compound the evidence that 2015 is almost certain to surpass 2014 as the hottest year in recorded history.
Dramatic changes in weather patterns are often associated with immediate consequences, particularly when extreme weather events are compounded by poor governance and poor policy choices. Political instability, social unrest, and in extreme cases armed conflict, as you grappled with, these secondary and tertiary impacts are really devastating.
Extreme weather events force farmers large and small to adapt their techniques and their crops. Declining fisheries exacerbate already-increasing tensions in maritime trade. Washed-out roads prevent movement of people and goods. Armed conflict destroys critical infrastructure. These changes lead to food scarcity or sudden and unsustainable price increases. And that’s why we call it the Food Chain Reaction.
In 2010 and 2011, we saw what could be just the future that is coming for us. We saw the impacts of climate change, of environmental degradation, and political instability converge. As many of you will remember, a series of cataclysmic weather events drove the price of wheat from $4 to $9 a bushel in less than a year. Record rainfall in Canada, the world’s second-largest wheat exporter, cut the country’s harvest by nearly a quarter.
Drought and brushfires in Russia, Ukraine, and Kazakhstan cut those countries’ wheat production by a third. The U.S., Australian, Argentinean and Chinese crops were also damaged by drought and storms.
But when the Arab Spring Awakening began, few people asked the question—isn’t it strange that these social uprisings are happening just at the moment that the world food prices hit record highs?
But, in hindsight we can appreciate that the Arab awakening was driven not only by political and economic factors, but by environmental, migratory and climate stressors as well. If we continue to focus only on the former, that is the political factors, and not the latter, the environmental factors, that lead to mass migration, that lead to environmental degradation, that lead to food insecurity, we will never be able to effectively stabilize societies in crisis.
So I hope that this game has underlined those core points and perhaps clarified some new issues for further study. That is why we are here. There is a simple reason: We have to begin to prepare for the inevitable next crisis. When disaster strikes the people gathered in this room tonight will have critical roles to play as leaders and decision-makers.
I believe that in most crises there is opportunity. Hopefully this simulation has shown that, too. That cooperation can overcome conflict.
Now, the past decade has been a tough one for multilateralism. From the wars in Iraq and Syria to the slow pace of climate negotiations, multilateralism and global cooperation can sometimes seem out of reach.
But over the past two days, in this exercise, we saw the risks we face when nations go it alone, and the effort to secure resources becomes competitive rather than cooperative. We also saw the benefits we all accrue when we come together to build a more effective response and more cooperation.
So as we approach the new climate negotiations in Paris, I have hope that our leaders finally recognize that cooperation is indeed imperative. We have achieved success in the past – 15 years ago the world’s nations came together to create the millennium development goals, which had a set a hugely ambitious targets to improve humanity the world over.
We didn’t achieve all of these goals and we didn’t achieve them in all places, but we made a big difference by working together. The rate of people living in extreme poverty was cut in half 5 years ahead of the 2015 deadline, mainly thanks to efforts of China, India, and Brazil. The world is also on track to halve the proportion of people who suffer from hunger this year.
The debate about the Millennium Development Goals proved that multilateralism can reshape our world for the better. I had the privilege to help shape the “first draft” of the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Agenda. As Marcia noted, I served on the Secretary General’s high-level panel that spent over a year in an intensely consultative process listening to people from around the globe, particularly very poor people, young people, and learning about their aspirations for a new set of global goals. And I can tell you with absolute conviction that the opportunity for real progress on these issues is still there, and the multilateral ideal is alive and well.
I had the privilege of working with Paula Caballero who worked in that enterprise, and I think she would agree with my assessment from what we saw in the high level panel. But more importantly, what we saw in September when Pope Francis kicked off the SDG special meeting of the UN General Assembly and the new SDG’s were approved by a unanimous vote of the United National General Assembly.
At their core, the new SDG’s call for a new global partnership with a commitment to ending poverty, within a framework of sustainability. The goals established global commitments, leaving no one behind, particularly women and girls – thank you Kathleen for raising that.
I think that everyone can see themselves and their efforts in these universal goals, from a young child, to a subsistence farmer, to a street vendor, to a business owner, to the President of the United States. That ideal, building a new global partnership, will again be put to the test in just a few weeks when the world gathers in Paris to negotiate a new global climate deal. The deal that must help address many of the challenges you have faced in this simulation over these past two days. I think these enterprises at the international level are really linked.
In order to build the kind of resilience that we are going to need, that you discussed over the past two days, we need to focus on the goals that are embedded in the SDG’s and build new models of sustainable economies, but we also need to tackle the climate challenge. Paris is obviously the moment when the world could come together to do that, to negotiate that new global climate deal, a deal that must help address these challenges.
We have not yet crossed the finish line on a global climate agreement. But there have been some big diplomatic breakthroughs that make me optimistic about the prospects for success in Paris, the foremost being the U.S.-China joint announcement of mutual action and emission reduction, which galvanized the commitment to put forward ambitious INDC’s. China committed to deploy an additional 800-1,000 gigawatts of nuclear, wind, solar, and other zero emission generation capacity by 2030. That’s a lot of clean energy – equivalent to nearly the total current electricity generation capacity in the United States. The U.S. pledged to double the pace of its GHG reductions and keep on a path to deep de-carbonization by midcentury, which as I understand it, what the group agreed to at the end of the fourth turn of this game.
But as we know, reducing emissions won’t be enough. We need to ensure that resilience and adaptation are also key pillars of the agreement in Paris. Without focusing on how climate change and environmental degradation will impact the livelihoods of the most vulnerable, we’re completely ignoring the full scope of the challenge. So as world leaders gather in Paris, they must build an agreement that reflects both of those 21st century realities.
First, all of the world’s major polluters must act to cut their baseline greenhouse gas emissions, and at the same time they must stay focused on helping the most vulnerable. We must not only help them weather the impacts of climate change, but we must help them martial resources to build, as I noted, sustainable, resilient economies for the future that are inclusive. That bring in the extreme poor, that connect them to the societies, to the politics, and to the economies of their countries.
Such an agreement is achievable, but we cannot fall back on old habits that pit region against region, North against South, or rich against poor.
There will invariably be moments of frustration, brinkmanship, and even crisis. That is how such talks always seem to go when there is a great deal at stake. I would only urge that in those moments, negotiators of the countries that will attend the meeting in Paris remember that billions of people around the globe are looking to them to work in a spirit of collaboration, cooperation, and partnership to shape the world we all want—for our children, our economies, and our societies.
Put simply: we can’t afford to wait, we can’t afford finger pointing, and we can’t afford half measures.
You’ve seen over the past few days the potential for decisions by big players to interact in unanticipated ways. And you’ve seen how the negative impacts often fall upon the most vulnerable. The Africa team has seen the importance of increasing its influence in the global policy arena. The United States, Europe and India have proven that they can successfully cooperate when it comes to increasing research and establishing funding streams to address pressing issues, and put a price on carbon.
The last two days have also shown that although traditional security challenges that we face today will not disappear, the Cold War-era thinking will not provide the solutions that we so desperately need. By broadening the discourse over what constitutes “security,” we will diminish distrust between countries and mobilize powerful civic and corporate partnerships.
Perhaps this seems Pollyannaish in today’s context, but I hope you will all take away the belief that serious cooperation on issues like food security, climate change, climate security, and environmental preservation serves all of our interests across the globe. Providing safe, affordable food supplies to a growing population is of course not a new problem, but it’s never been more challenging than it is today. Population growth, rapid urbanization, eroding infrastructure, climate change, extreme weather, ocean degradation, ocean acidification, new strains of crop disease, political instability and conflict are only making it more difficult for us to feed the world, in particular our most vulnerable.
If we focus on the challenges of human security, livelihood protection, and sustainable development, I believe we all stand to benefit greatly. If we can revise our traditional conceptions of security to more reflect the world we live in today, we can hope to mobilize greater resources in times of crisis. And if we work together to address the root causes of conflict and instability, we just might be able to insulate the most vulnerable states and societies against these threats.
As I spoke with some of you after the game, I heard a lot of great ideas. Molly already went through some of them. I particularly like that “blue sky science” model – that’s a particular passion of mine. Some were focused on improving or better-resourcing our existing multilateral framework for addressing these issues. Some put forward ideas for entirely new institutions meant to fill existing gaps. Some put forward ideas about how we resource challenges in front of us. That is, produce the funds necessary to make the right investments and produce those sustainable economies.
Here is what I’m going to ask all of you: Take them home with you. Keep working on those ideas and expanding them. Talk about this exercise and the lessons you learned from it. And keep talking to each other – I hope this is the beginning of a great global food security network. All of our work is strengthened by maintaining these ties and continuing to work outside and across our areas of expertise.
So with that: thank you all for gaming with us. Thank you all very much for your time, your expertise, and your contributions. Most of all, thank you for your commitment to solving what will be the future generations’ most important security challenge. Thank you for taking these two days and taking time to do something I couldn’t think of as more important than the enterprise of ideas and the solutions that you hopefully have been able to map out in your two days. Thank you very much.

mnew9
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS circus

Unread post by mnew9 » Sat May 02, 2020 4:11 am

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison is promising to ease coronavirus restrictions BUT ONLY IF millions of Australians agree to download a CovidSafe tracking app to their smart phone. The app uses Bluetooth connections to determine who infected people came into close contact with. The use of the app is voluntary, but has been met with resistance from some critics due to privacy concerns.
Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Friday revealed 3.45million people have already downloaded CovidSafe since it was released on Monday - but more downloads are needed in order to ease coronavirus restrictions.
Millions more Australians need to download the coronavirus tracking app if they wish to return to normal life soon, the government has said.
All restrictions will be reviewed, from pub visits to shopping centre operations. Mr Morrison told Aussies if they were eager to go back to the pub soon they must download the app. ;)

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... 9-app.html

Image

SacredCowSlayer
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS circus

Unread post by SacredCowSlayer » Sat May 02, 2020 3:19 pm

glg wrote:
Sat May 02, 2020 1:21 am
regarding 5G - how, may I ask does anyone here think informatiom is transmited from one of your 5G cell towers to the next neighbors 5G cell tower?

In order for it to work with some stealth connectivity I mean.
Dear glg,

Sorry, but I’m not sure I understand your question. Would you mind restating it?
_______________________

Also, (to our members and readers) I have been planning to open a thread specifically dedicated to research concerning the 5G issue. Please note that I have not thoroughly researched the topic yet. While it’s entirely possible that the whole thing is purely a scare tactic (or fear-mongering) along the lines of nukes (for example), I do think the wide use of these types of technologies warrant discussion on this forum.

My strong suggestion and encouragement to our members would be to lay out the facts, and keep an open mind about the possibility (or even likelihood) that the effects of such technologies will be a mixed bag of sorts. It need not be the typical (and frustrating) binary case of “yes it is real” or “no, it’s just a psy-op” (re 5G).

Finally, while the issue has cropped up in the context of a plandemic, it need not be intertwined in those dedicated threads. I will be taking the (somewhat) unusual step of moving posts concerning 5G over to this newly created topic. Thank you all for your contributions.

Note: This could be a work in progress over the next couple of days—as time allows.

Petrov86
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS circus

Unread post by Petrov86 » Sat May 02, 2020 3:46 pm

SacredCowSlayer wrote:
Sat May 02, 2020 3:19 pm
glg wrote:
Sat May 02, 2020 1:21 am
regarding 5G - how, may I ask does anyone here think informatiom is transmited from one of your 5G cell towers to the next neighbors 5G cell tower?

In order for it to work with some stealth connectivity I mean.
Dear glg,

Sorry, but I’m not sure I understand your question. Would you mind restating it?
_______________________

Also, (to our members and readers) I have been planning to open a thread specifically dedicated to research concerning the 5G issue. Please note that I have not thoroughly researched the topic yet. While it’s entirely possible that the whole thing is purely a scare tactic (or fear-mongering) along the lines of nukes (for example), I do think the wide use of these types of technologies warrant discussion on this forum.

My strong suggestion and encouragement to our members would be to lay out the facts, and keep an open mind about the possibility (or even likelihood) that the effects of such technologies will be a mixed bag of sorts. It need not be the typical (and frustrating) binary case of “yes it is real” or “no, it’s just a psy-op” (re 5G).

Finally, while the issue has cropped up in the context of a plandemic, it need not be intertwined in those dedicated threads. I will be taking the (somewhat) unusual step of moving posts concerning 5G over to this newly created topic. Thank you all for your contributions.

Note: This could be a work in progress over the next couple of days—as time allows.
Great! I find too that 5g is interesting topic and may (or may not) be related to Covid-19. Having its own thread is a very nice solution. Thanks!

SacredCowSlayer
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS circus

Unread post by SacredCowSlayer » Sat May 02, 2020 9:19 pm

smiley wrote:
Fri May 01, 2020 6:08 am
This is the direction we are headed:


https://youtu.be/8St5km2sPVc

Horribly dystopian if you ask me. :wacko:
Dear smiley,

I watched the video you linked above. For our readers—basically, the video consists of a guy reading an article about the dot/chip implants (containing medical information such as vaccinated etc.) that could be read by smart phones (and other devices) to “allow” people to re-enter social and employment environments. The background has ominous music to ramp up the fear factor.

I’ve had my eye on all things “chip” related since the 90s, and there’s no doubt that society is constantly being primed for what appears to be an eventual reality. My personal take—for what it’s worth—is that these types of articles are generated, and the responses are monitored to gauge the present level of resistance. My instinct at the moment is that they are still a good ways off from actually forcing this on us.

That said, I do think these genuinely evil and freakish ideas are also dropped on us so that we won’t see (or perhaps even complain much about) the less draconian measures being implemented for what they are. The idea is that we are too busy being “thankful” that we aren’t being dragged into a clinic or tent for a forced chip implant.

In my local jurisdiction the County and City governments recently (4/24/2020) implemented a mask in public requirement. Over that weekend (4/25–4/26) I made it absolutely clear (to a top civil authority) that I will not comply. I’ve been quiet and haven’t “rocked the boat,” but now I refuse to go further.

This person understood that I was not bluffing in the slightest. The following day, the Governor (TX) issued an Executive Order which precluded local jurisdictions within the state from imposing civil or criminal penalties for failure to wear masks—thus invalidating our local laws on the matter.

I think we all have to decide what we are absolutely unwilling to do, and be willing to face the consequences for it (whatever that may look like under the given circumstances). In the face of any order to forcibly vaccinate anyone in my home—I don’t think for one minute that ANY law enforcement, soldier, or otherwise would even think about it. They would literally have to be willing to lose some personnel over the effort.

Without getting into politics here (which I truly loathe), I’ll say that there truly is a benefit to having a broadly armed society. This is not a fact that is lost on law enforcement.

heniek1812
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Re: The CORONAVIRUS circus

Unread post by heniek1812 » Sat May 02, 2020 10:21 pm

SacredCowSlayer wrote:
Sat May 02, 2020 9:19 pm

In my local jurisdiction the County and City governments recently (4/24/2020) implemented a mask in public requirement. Over that weekend (4/25–4/26) I made it absolutely clear (to a top civil authority) that I will not comply. I’ve been quiet and haven’t “rocked the boat,” but now I refuse to go further.

This person understood that I was not bluffing in the slightest. The following day, the Governor (TX) issued an Executive Order which precluded local jurisdictions within the state from imposing civil or criminal penalties for failure to wear masks—thus invalidating our local laws on the matter.

I think we all have to decide what we are absolutely unwilling to do, and be willing to face the consequences for it (whatever that may look like under the given circumstances). In the face of any order to forcibly vaccinate anyone in my home—I don’t think for one minute that ANY law enforcement, soldier, or otherwise would even think about it. They would literally have to be willing to lose some personnel over the effort.

Without getting into politics here (which I truly loathe), I’ll say that there truly is a benefit to having a broadly armed society. This is not a fact that is lost on law enforcement.
I think you have gauged the situation correctly. They are stress testing the System and seeing what the response is. Only then do they decide how to move forward. I think you are absolutely right, one MUST draw the line somewhere and stick to it no matter what. One may not realize it but that will be a nucleus to a greater movement in Society.

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