Miscellaneous NASA comedies

If NASA faked the moon landings, does the agency have any credibility at all? Was the Space Shuttle program also a hoax? Is the International Space Station another one? Do not dismiss these hypotheses offhand. Check out our wider NASA research and make up your own mind about it all.
totalrecall
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Re: Miscellaneous NASA comedies

Unread post by totalrecall » Fri May 17, 2013 9:50 am

I saw this a while ago and just thought of it now.

Someone from NASA put up a video of a weather balloon showing us that we can all do this too, to help "inspire" us. Their descriptive comment on the video sounds like a full admission of fakery of the other stuff they show us. It's a bizarre comment to say the least.


full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwVqmeFBXOw

Ever wondered what happens at 119,000 feet, minus 83 degrees fahrenheit, air pressures akin to those on the planet Mars - and your propulsion system bursts? What happens next is a brief free fall at 500 mph before parachuting nearly 40 km to the Earth below.

Here is how I experienced all of this last Saturday morning, March 10, 2012. All while carrying a solar radiation badge to measure the solar radiation impact in the Stratosphere after the M-class solar flare earlier that morning. Also with me on board; sunflower seeds. Those were a variety called "Sunspot" (Helianthus annuus). These are shorter than the more familiar giant variety and are favorites in classrooms where space is limited.

All of this is real, no Hollywood, no stunt double, no camera tricks, no green screen.

This is science! This is engineering! This is what YOU can do too! This is to inspire our kids.

You will be able to read about our scientific findings in one of the upcoming segments of Science@NASA. Stay tuned.

hoi.polloi
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Re: Miscellaneous NASA comedies

Unread post by hoi.polloi » Fri May 17, 2013 10:45 am

Yes, it is certainly a compelling pitch.
All of this is real, no Hollywood, no stunt double, no camera tricks, no green screen.
Step right up! No mirrors! No tricks! Observe my sleeves. Nothing in the hat ...
Here little man, take the hammer, you can win a prize!

fast67vellen2o
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NASA Funding a 3D Food Printer

Unread post by fast67vellen2o » Tue May 21, 2013 4:57 pm

I remember reading this thread:

http://www.cluesforum.info/viewtopic.ph ... 6#p2382326

And when I came across this tidbit this morning, I thought I had to share it here. Ever since joining this forum, I instantly question anything that is NASA related. NASA is funding this "research" based on the alleged future mars mission.

http://www.theverge.com/2013/5/21/43509 ... nter-pizza

Banazir
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Re: Miscellaneous NASA comedies

Unread post by Banazir » Wed May 29, 2013 5:04 pm

Wow, soon we'll have some more real and impossible to fake images from the moon. Don't forget to have your homemade robots ready and on the moon soon or you'll miss out on the grand prize!

"Moon telescope to offer new views of Earth and space"
http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story ... scope.html



Now we will all be able to get close up photos of falling debris. Exciting stuff.

http://www.cbc.ca/player/News/Technolog ... 387906092/


I hope my sarcasm is apparent.


Banazir

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Re: Miscellaneous NASA comedies

Unread post by Banazir » Thu May 30, 2013 6:54 pm

Its funny too how that only sometimes is radiation a concern.

http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/wor ... story.html

Banazir
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Re: Miscellaneous NASA comedies

Unread post by Banazir » Thu May 30, 2013 9:34 pm

Anyone here have a grasp on this 3D printing nonsense? Sounds to me like a magic tool ala 'Doctor Who' that they pull out of their arse to fill in a plot hole in a story. Bad Sci-Fi.

http://m.computerworld.com/s/article/92 ... _NASA_says_

Banazir
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Re: Miscellaneous NASA comedies

Unread post by Banazir » Fri May 31, 2013 6:06 pm

When travelling to the moon, don't forget it has "extra" gravity. Just pockets of extra gravity though so don't be too alarmed when you go.

http://science.time.com/2013/05/30/reve ... n-mostpop2

anonjedi2
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Re: Miscellaneous NASA comedies

Unread post by anonjedi2 » Sat Jun 01, 2013 8:14 pm

So, NAZA claims to have captured this amazing photo of this Guatamela Volcano from Space. I have been unable to find the original image on NAZA's website for further information, but I want to know the following:

1) From where was this photo taken? The ISS? Another satellite?

2) What type of camera was used?

3) What type of lens was used?

4) How far was the spacecraft/satellite into earth's lower orbit when this photo was snapped?

Image

http://www.raginghadron.com/quick-scien ... from-space

fbenario
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Re: Miscellaneous NASA comedies

Unread post by fbenario » Sun Jun 02, 2013 12:14 am

It certainly doesn't look trustworthy to me. Notice the rectangular nature of the pixels. Further, if you look closely at the original image above, you can see odd rectangular segments, especially in the brownish parts.

Image

http://fotoforensics.com/analysis.php?i ... 4997.36069

hoi.polloi
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Re: Miscellaneous NASA comedies

Unread post by hoi.polloi » Sun Jun 02, 2013 3:08 am

I am not sure if you noticed, but pixels generally tend to be rectangular.

anonjedi2
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Re: Miscellaneous NASA comedies

Unread post by anonjedi2 » Tue Jun 04, 2013 12:48 am

hoi, I would love to hear your thoughts on this video which portrays NASA's magic thermal tiles which allows you to hold 2,200 degree heat in your hand. <_<

http://gizmodo.com/nasas-magic-thermal- ... -511108548

icarusinbound
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Re: Miscellaneous NASA comedies

Unread post by icarusinbound » Fri Jun 28, 2013 9:25 pm

Voyager surfs Solar System's edge

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-23075332 28 June 2013 Last updated at 00:49
By Jonathan Amos Science correspondent, BBC News wrote:
"It could be any day, but it could also be several more years."


Ed Stone cannot say when the Voyager-1 spacecraft will leave the Solar System, but he believes the moment is close.

The latest data from this extraordinary probe, reported in this week's Science journal, suggests it is surfing right on the very edge of our Sun's domain.

The particles streaming away from our star have reduced to a trickle at its present location, 18.5 billion km from Earth.

Particles flying towards it from interstellar space, by contrast, have jumped markedly in the past year.

It all points to an imminent departure, which would make Voyager the first man-made object to cross into the space between the stars.

"It's hard to imagine there's another layer between the one we're in and the outside," Dr Stone told BBC News. "Topologically, it makes sense that this is the outermost layer. The only question is: how thick is it?"

Launched way back in 1977, the probe has now travelled so far from home that its constant chatter of data takes 17 hours to arrive at the US space agency's receiving network. And chatter, it does.

Voyager's instruments are busy sampling the far-flung environment. This has allowed Dr Stone and colleagues to map the shape and reach of the heliosphere - the giant bubble of charged particles blown off from our Sun.

In 2004, it reached a turbulent region referred to as the heliosheath, where particles bounced around in all directions.

It was expected this would be the final stage before the leap to interstellar space. But, as has been the case throughout this 35-year mission, Voyager threw up yet another surprise.

Last year, it detected what appears to be a discrete boundary layer that Ed Stone's team call the "heliosheath depletion region" in Friday's three Science papers.

It is a kind of magnetic highway where energetic particles on the inside can get out easily, and the galactic cosmic ray particles on the outside can zoom in.

"It is where the Sun's magnetic field has piled up, compressed up against itself. It has also doubled in strength. It's smoother than anything we've ever seen with Voyager," Dr Stone explained.
Ed Stone Ed Stone has worked on the Voyager project from the beginning

The team is now watching the direction of the field lines very carefully. Currently, they orientate east-west, wound into a spiral by the rotating Sun. But when Voyager finally breaks through into interstellar space, they are expected to shift dramatically, running north-south.

This is an acid test for Dr Stone. Although some might argue the particle data is evidence of Voyager being outside the Solar System, the project leader believes the probe cannot truly be said to be beyond the Sun's domain until it has also escaped our star's magnetic influence.

But do not expect an immediate, definitive announcement from Nasa that Voyager is in interstellar space when the magnetic signal does switch.

Instead, the instrument scientists will sit and listen to the probe's chatter, perhaps for several months. They will want to be absolutely sure Voyager has broken through the so-called heliopause.

Like the surfer who rides the front of a breaking wave, battling the foam, Voyager will take some time to move completely clear of everything behind.

"The edge may be somewhat turbulent. We just don't know," Dr Stone told BBC News. "This is exploration after all, and we will find out how Nature makes this interface. But it will be moving because the Sun does 'breathe' in and out."

Voyager 1 is on course to approach a star called AC +793888, but it will only get to within two light-years of it and take some 40,000 years to make the passage.

Voyager 2, which was launched a few weeks before Voyager 1, is on a slightly slower path to interstellar space and is probably a few years from seeing the heliosheath depletion region.

Both probes have sufficient power in their plutonium "batteries" to keep working into the next decade.
There was an excellent piece, I think on 'Clues', regarding how dated the technology would be, on Voyager, from the far-off era of TV shows like The Six Million Dollar Man, Love Boat, Kojak and Mary Tyler Moore. Ancient tech, all zero-generation TTL/DTL logic gates and germanium diodes, constantly baked by cosmic rays. Sending data back, over more than 18 billion miles, for more than 35 yrs, home to the trusty DSN. Who cares about data-link path viability, baud rates, CRC checks, signal-to-noise, sunspot radiation....the magical Voyagers just keep-on churning out that meaningful data.

And like the scientist says, it could be leaving the solar system right now...or it may take a few more years. And then a further 40,000 years to travel the next leg of it's journey.

I now pinch myself, to check that I'm really here, take a deep breath, and post this in closing:

Image

How many boxes does Voyager tick, I wonder??
Image

eyesopenwider
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Re: Miscellaneous NASA comedies

Unread post by eyesopenwider » Thu Jul 04, 2013 3:57 am

"By early last year, the Jason-2 satellite was calibrated making the original Jason superfluous. By that time, there were concerns that enough hardware on Jason had failed to leave limited backup options in case something else went wrong. As a result, Jason was shifted to a graveyard orbit and the remaining fuel was vented."

http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/07/ ... satellite/

So V'ger is still going strong after 35 years running on 1970's tech as opposed to lil ol Jason...only lasted 12 years...Guess they don't build em like they used to.

hoi.polloi
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Re: Miscellaneous NASA comedies

Unread post by hoi.polloi » Thu Jul 04, 2013 4:28 am

anonjedi2 wrote:hoi, I would love to hear your thoughts on this video which portrays NASA's magic thermal tiles which allows you to hold 2,200 degree heat in your hand. <_<

http://gizmodo.com/nasas-magic-thermal- ... -511108548
I won't submit that the goggly-eyed owner of the video looks like an Italian Mafia's son. But the video itself looks pretty staged to me. The guy sounds like he watched a bunch of videos about 'tour guides' and is trying very hard to sound like them. He's nervous and barely rehearsed. The off-camera questions are very 'fringe theater'.

Then you have the dainty Masonic-sign coming in to hold the cube, which is hilariously named "LI-900" (lie?), and the entire thing is not that distant from a slapped-together video game cut scene. I call 'augmented reality' shenanigans.

simonshack
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Re: Miscellaneous NASA comedies

Unread post by simonshack » Sun Jul 14, 2013 11:37 am

Allright folks - here we go... Time to dust off our laser guns ! :lol: :rolleyes:


Friday, July 05, 2013
Astronomers detect mysterious radio signals from 11 billion light years away

Image
http://thespacereporter.com/2013/07/ast ... -galaxies/


Sunday, July 7, 2013 - 9:01
Mysterious Radio Signals From 11 Billion Light Years Away Detected
http://beforeitsnews.com/space/2013/07/ ... 62482.html
"The scientists studied the energy of these bursts and concluded that they originate from an extreme astrophysical event involving relativistic objects such as neutron stars or black holes."

"Relativistic objects"!! - no less ! :lol: :lol: :lol:


...and today, in Italy, it is sold as "Big News from NASA" - with our hero Parmitano ready for action!
Image
Misteriosi lampi di onde radio, intercettate dagli scienziati per la prima volta nella storia al di fuori della nostra galassia. L'origine di questi eventi, per ora, inspiegabili risalirebbe addirittura a undici miliardi di anni luce di distanza dalla Terra. Le ipotesi sul campo sono molte. Su una cosa sono tutti d'accordo: "Arrivano da un evento incredibile, in grado di produrre un'energia enorme"
http://www.affaritaliani.it/cronache/ra ... refresh_ce


But hey - all of this is OLD news! Here's a 2009 article from the Corrriere Della Sera by Margherita Hack, (Italy's recently deceased "female Einstein"):
"Chandra e anche il satellite Spitzer per l' infrarosso hanno osservato ventinove «blobs», estesi ciascuno parecchie centinaia di migliaia di anniluce (per confronto il diametro della nostra Via lattea è circa centomila anniluce) in una vasta zona di cielo e si trovano a una distanza di circa 11 miliardi di anni luce da noi (...)"
http://archiviostorico.corriere.it/2009 ... 7041.shtml
If you don't read Italian - here's what Margie is on about:
"The mysterious 29 blobs discovered by NASA's Chandra satellite, at about 11 light years from Earth"...

Image
http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2009/labs/

OMG - all this is sooo terrifying ! :P

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