Fakery in Orbit: THE I$$

If NASA faked the moon landings, does the agency have any credibility at all? Was the Space Shuttle program also a hoax? Is the International Space Station another one? Do not dismiss these hypotheses offhand. Check out our wider NASA research and make up your own mind about it all.

Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby fbenario on Wed Feb 29, 2012 1:36 am

whatsgoingon wrote:Ether is the air that the gods at NASA breathe.

What a great album. Unsurpassed.


full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7sNfbprnKU
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Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby whatsgoingon on Wed Feb 29, 2012 4:39 am

a
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Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby Heiwa on Wed Feb 29, 2012 12:21 pm

simonshack wrote:
Q_prime wrote:Who took these pictures? From where?

Dear Qprime,

Those images are credited to Italian Paolo Nespoli, who allegedly shot them in 2011 from the Soyuz module (pictured below) as it detached from the ISS for atmosphere re-entry and be parachute-landed down in Siberia.
Image
Image
Image
(Paolo Nespoli is the astronot at far right)


Does the Soyuz module really have a window/port hole for taking pictures? And how do you steer it? OK, the Soyuz module is on top of a Russian rocket that ejects the module into orbit around Earth. After that the orbiting Soyuz module shall find the orbiting ISS and connect to it. Sounds complicated. But maybe there is a window so navigation is done by eye à la Costa Concordia?
On return the Soyuz module disconnects from the ISS and slowly decends to Earth, opens a parachute and ... voilà ... you are on the snowy, ice cold steppe of Kazakstan or Russian Siberia somewhere! Amazing.
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Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby simonshack on Wed Feb 29, 2012 1:32 pm

Heiwa wrote:Does the Soyuz module really have a window/port hole for taking pictures? And how do you steer it? OK, the Soyuz module is on top of a Russian rocket that ejects the module into orbit around Earth. After that the orbiting Soyuz module shall find the orbiting ISS and connect to it. Sounds complicated. But maybe there is a window so navigation is done by eye à la Costa Concordia?
On return the Soyuz module disconnects from the ISS and slowly decends to Earth, opens a parachute and ... voilà ... you are on the snowy, ice cold steppe of Kazakstan or Russian Siberia somewhere! Amazing.


Oh yeah, Heiwa

I believe the soyuz actually has as many as two portholes - one on each side of the module:

Image
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soyuz_%28spacecraft%29

As you see, snapping pictures from that panoramic porthole should be no problem at all...
Image
http://www.flickr.com/photos/europeansp ... 706892396/
Porthole of scorched Soyuz TM-33 reentry module
"ESA astronaut Roberto Vittori (IT) looks through the porthole of the scorched reentry module of Soyuz TM-33 as he waits for the members of the Russian recovery team to help the crew out shortly after landing in the steppes of Kazakhstan."


Of course, the spacious interiors of the Soyuz modules allow for comfortable handling of a 35mm reflex camera.
At far right, we have Italian astronot Nespoli (the man credited with the spectacular 2011 images of the ISS):
Image
"US astronaut, flight engineer Catherine "Cady" Coleman (L), Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli (R) and the Expedition 27 Commander, Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev , sit inside their Soyuz TMA-20 capsule just after the landing in Kazakhstan on May 24 - 2011."

One can only imagine how many scientific/medical experiments these selfless astronots may perform in such a sophisticated space vessel - for the common good of humanity. Just think what progress must have been made towards eliminating the ugly scourge of claustrophobia. Each time we take an elevator, we can thank these guys for what they do to relieve our ancestral fears.

And if you were wondering how the thing returns and lands (in the steppes of Kazasthan)...

Landing system: On a normal mission, descent is initiated by a 3-4 min ~155 m/s retroburn by the main engine, followed by OM and then SM ejection. The landing system is activated by pressure switch at 9-11 km and 850 km/h, with two sequential stabilizing drogues releasing the 4.25 m braking 'chute from the port compartment. The primary canopy is deployed reefed at 8 km. It is freed to its full 35.5 m diameter at a descent rate of around 35 m/s to reduce sink rate to 8 m/s. The reserve systems yields 10 m/s descent rate with 25 m 'chute, activated at 6 km. The heat shield is dropped at about 3 km some 5 min before landing to clear the base retromotors for a soft landing. Four solids are triggered by a radar altimeter about 2 m above the ground to cushion the impact. Touchdown is normally on land but Soyuz is equipped for water landings.
http://www.braeunig.us/space/specs/soyuz.htm
Image
"The Russian Soyuz TMA-20 space capsule lands about 150 km south-east of the Kazakh town of Dzhezkazgan on May 24, 2011. A Soyuz space capsule carrying an Italian, a Russian and an American back from the International Space Station (ISS) has landed safely in Kazakhstan, Russian mission control said."

http://photoblog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011/05/24/6705280-soyuz-capsule-landed-safely-in-kazakhstan

As they say - being an astronot must be the coolest job on Earth! :P
pb-110523-soyuz-jc-02.photoblog900.jpg
https://web.archive.org/web/20120123003 ... kazakhstan

Older link:
http://spaceplex.com/2011/03/16/space-station-astronauts-return-to-earth/
[ADMIN: Fixing broken links/images pass 01-14-2018 -HP]
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Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby Makkonen on Wed Feb 29, 2012 1:52 pm

Those pictures are so hilarious. :lol:

Space agencies are definitely more like comedy agencies.
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Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby Heiwa on Wed Feb 29, 2012 3:38 pm

Here the Soyuz modules come flying up to the ISS:
Image
Backdropped by a blue and white Earth, this close-up view features the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft approaching the International Space Station (ISS). Onboard the spacecraft are cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency; astronaut John L. Phillips, NASA ISS science officer and flight engineer; and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Roberto Vittori of Italy. The Soyuz linked to the Pirs Docking Compartment at 9:20 p.m. (CDT) on April 16, 2005 as the two spacecraft flew over eastern Asia. The docking followed Friday’s launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Source: http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/ima ... 24875.html

The porthole can be seen on the top of the re-entry module. Lucky that it was directed towards the ISS at departure. :rolleyes:
Docking Soyuz/ISS is fully automatic and done from Earth ... as long as it works! :D
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Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby Jonathan on Wed Feb 29, 2012 4:12 pm

There is a window near the top of the orbital module, facing forward - clearly visible below the docking mechanism - in the picture Heiwa posted above.
The photos and video where taken from there.
... no, the orbital module does not land, at least not in one piece ... same for the service module ...
Especially to seize the opportunity (Shuttle docked to ISS while another ship leaves the station) they interrupted the normal undocking - deorbiting procedure to give Nespoli about half an hour to get there - and back in afterwards - to take the photos and video - while the ISS turned to give different/better perspective.
See here for instance: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymLaVD8mkrM
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Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby Heiwa on Wed Feb 29, 2012 4:47 pm

Jonathan wrote:There is a window near the top of the orbital module, facing forward - clearly visible below the docking mechanism - in the picture Heiwa posted above.
The photos and video where taken from there.
... no, the orbital module does not land, at least not in one piece ... same for the service module ...
Especially to seize the opportunity (Shuttle docked to ISS while another ship leaves the station) they interrupted the normal undocking - deorbiting procedure to give Nespoli about half an hour to get there - and back in afterwards - to take the photos and video - while the ISS turned to give different/better perspective.
See here for instance: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymLaVD8mkrM

You really believe it? :D :P :lol:
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Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby Jonathan on Wed Feb 29, 2012 4:58 pm

What do you mean a little more precisely?
What I wrote? Yes
The very existence of ISS and Soyuz? Yes
The window in Soyuz? Yes
...
Always glad to give you a good time ;)
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Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby lux on Thu Mar 01, 2012 2:34 am

Landing system: On a normal mission, descent is initiated by a 3-4 min ~155 m/s retroburn by the main engine, followed by OM and then SM ejection. The landing system is activated by pressure switch at 9-11 km and 850 km/h, with two sequential stabilizing drogues releasing the 4.25 m braking 'chute from the port compartment. The primary canopy is deployed reefed at 8 km. It is freed to its full 35.5 m diameter at a descent rate of around 35 m/s to reduce sink rate to 8 m/s. The reserve systems yields 10 m/s descent rate with 25 m 'chute, activated at 6 km. The heat shield is dropped at about 3 km some 5 min before landing to clear the base retromotors for a soft landing. Four solids are triggered by a radar altimeter about 2 m above the ground to cushion the impact. Touchdown is normally on land but Soyuz is equipped for water landings.
http://www.braeunig.us/space/specs/soyuz.htm

Image



It says, "Four solids are triggered by a radar altimeter about 2 m above the ground to cushion the impact. "

I presume "solids" means solid fuel rockets. And, they're triggered by an altimeter at 2 meters above ground? That's about 6 feet. Must be a very precise altimeter. And, since solid fuel rockets can't be turned off once ignited, landing in this thing must be a wild, suspence-filled experience.
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Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby AnonymousTruther2 on Fri Mar 02, 2012 1:13 am

NASA Laptop Stolen With Command Codes That Control Space Station :lol:

WASHINGTON (CBSDC) — NASA’s inspector general revealed in congressional testimony that a space agency computer was stolen last year with the command codes to control the International Space Station. :ph34r:

In a statement given to a House committee on the security challenges facing NASA, Paul K. Martin said that an unencrypted NASA computer stolen last year was one of 48 taken between April 2009 and April 2011.

“The March 2011 theft of an unencrypted NASA notebook computer resulted in the loss of algorithms used to command and control the International Space Station,” Martin said in his written testimony. “Other lost or stolen notebooks contained Social Security numbers and sensitive data on NASA’s Constellation and Orion programs.

In 2010 and 2011, there were 5,408 computer security incidents at the space agency costing NASA an estimated $7 million.

“These incidents spanned a wide continuum from individuals testing their skill to break into NASA systems, to well-organized criminal enterprises hacking for profit, to intrusions that may have been sponsored by foreign intelligence services seeking to further their countries:lol: objectives,” Martin said.

Last year, NASA was the victim of 47(11?) cyberattacks, with 13 :huh: of those attacks successfully compromising the agency’s computers. In one of those attacks, credentials for more than 150 employees were stolen.

Another attack involved Chinese-based IP addresses that gained full access to systems and sensitive user accounts at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. <_<

The Office of Management and Budget reported that only 1 percent of NASA’s portable devices and laptops have been encrypted this year. :P

“Until NASA fully implements an Agency-wide data encryption solution, sensitive data on its mobile computing and portable data storage devices will remain at high risk for loss or theft,” Martin explained in his testimony.

Image

In this handout image provided by NASA, astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer, waits at an International Space Station’s pressurized mating adapter (PMA-2) docked to the space shuttle Atlantis, as the station’s robotic system moves the failed pump module (out of frame) over to the spacewalking astronaut and the shuttle’s cargo bay during a planned six-and-a-half-hour spacewalk on July 12, 2011. (credit: NASA via Getty Images)
(Nasa and Getty Images, again? is there something there?)

http://washington.cbslocal.com/2012/03/ ... e-station/
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Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby AnonymousTruther2 on Fri Mar 02, 2012 4:56 am

Chinese hackers took over NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab, Inspector General reveals

Chinese hackers gained control over NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in November, which could have allowed them delete sensitive files, add user accounts to mission-critical systems, upload hacking tools, and more -- all at a central repository of U.S. space technology, according to a report released Wednesday afternoon by the Office of the Inspector General.

That report revealed scant details of an ongoing investigation into the incident against the Pasadena, Calif., lab, noting only that cyberattacks against the JPL involved Chinese-based Internet Protocol (IP) addresses. :huh:

Paul K. Martin, NASA's inspector general, put his conclusions bluntly.

"The attackers had full functional control over these networks," he wrote.

JPL is a jewel in NASA's space technology crown. :lol:

Beyond a wealth of exploration programs, such as the recent GRAIL mission to study the moon and the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory, JPL manages the Deep Space Network, a network of antenna complexes on several continents that monitors both outer space and planet Earth.

Martin released written testimony about the attacks in the report "NASA Cybersecurity: An Examination of the Agency’s Information Security," presented to the House Science, Space and Technology Committee investigations panel on Wednesday. It details a host of security lapses and breaches of protocol at the space agency.

"In 2010 and 2011, NASA reported 5,408 computer security incidents that resulted in the installation of malicious software on or unauthorized access to its systems," his report states. "These incidents spanned a wide continuum from individuals testing their skill to break into NASA systems, to well-organized criminal enterprises hacking for profit."

Other incidents "may have been sponsored by foreign intelligence services seeking to further their countries’ objectives,” he noted.

NASA offered a statement to FoxNews.com saying that there was never a threat to the International Space Station, but did not specifically address whether there was a threat to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

"NASA has made significant progress to better protect the agency's IT systems and is in the process of implementing the recommendations made by the NASA Inspector General in this area," Michael Cabbage, NASA spokesman said.

The office of the Inspector General declined to offer further details, telling FoxNews.com it could not comment on the ongoing investigation. A spokesman for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory did not respond to requests for more details about the incident. :rolleyes:

It's not known how the number and scope of computer security breaches at NASA compare to other federal agencies because NASA's Office of the Inspector General is the only OIG that regularly conducts international network intrusion cases, Discovery News reported Thursday.

In another successful attack against a NASA agency detailed in the OIG report, intruders stole a laptop computer that contained algorithms used to command and control the International Space Station (ISS), detailed by Discovery News.

"Some of these intrusions have affected thousands of NASA computers, caused significant disruption to mission operations, and resulted in the theft of export-controlled and otherwise sensitive data, with an estimated cost to NASA of more than $7 million," Martin wrote.

NASA said it is aware of the problem and taking steps to improve its computer security programs.

"The NASA IT Security program is transforming and maturing," the agency's chief information officer Linda Cureton said in her written testimony to the same panel.

"NASA is increasing visibility and responsiveness through enhanced information security monitoring of NASA's systems across the agency," she said.

http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/03/ ... rol-codes/
[ADMIN: Fixing broken links/images pass 01-14-2018; this link no longer works. Try possibly relevant articles below. -HP]
FOX: http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2012/05/03/ ... gency.html
CBS: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/space-stati ... en-laptop/
NBC: http://www.nbcnews.com/id/46591964/ns/t ... rol-codes/
SPACE.com: http://www.space.com/14750-stolen-nasa-laptop.html

Image
An artist's conception of NASA's next Martian rover, called Curiosity, one of many U.S. missions to the Red Planet run by the Jet Propulsion Lab. (NASA/JPL)
Yeah! make it look fake enough so it looks real enough when you'll stage the whole thing. :lol:

I have a hard time believing they used "Chinese-based IP addresses" to hack NASA.
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Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby Dcopymope on Thu Mar 08, 2012 9:35 pm

AnonymousTruther2 wrote:NASA Laptop Stolen With Command Codes That Control Space Station :lol:

WASHINGTON (CBSDC) — NASA’s inspector general revealed in congressional testimony that a space agency computer was stolen last year with the command codes to control the International Space Station. :ph34r:

In a statement given to a House committee on the security challenges facing NASA, Paul K. Martin said that an unencrypted NASA computer stolen last year was one of 48 taken between April 2009 and April 2011.

“The March 2011 theft of an unencrypted NASA notebook computer resulted in the loss of algorithms used to command and control the International Space Station,” Martin said in his written testimony. “Other lost or stolen notebooks contained Social Security numbers and sensitive data on NASA’s Constellation and Orion programs.

In 2010 and 2011, there were 5,408 computer security incidents at the space agency costing NASA an estimated $7 million.

“These incidents spanned a wide continuum from individuals testing their skill to break into NASA systems, to well-organized criminal enterprises hacking for profit, to intrusions that may have been sponsored by foreign intelligence services seeking to further their countries:lol: objectives,” Martin said.

Last year, NASA was the victim of 47(11?) cyberattacks, with 13 :huh: of those attacks successfully compromising the agency’s computers. In one of those attacks, credentials for more than 150 employees were stolen.

Another attack involved Chinese-based IP addresses that gained full access to systems and sensitive user accounts at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. <_<

The Office of Management and Budget reported that only 1 percent of NASA’s portable devices and laptops have been encrypted this year. :P

“Until NASA fully implements an Agency-wide data encryption solution, sensitive data on its mobile computing and portable data storage devices will remain at high risk for loss or theft,” Martin explained in his testimony.

Image

In this handout image provided by NASA, astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer, waits at an International Space Station’s pressurized mating adapter (PMA-2) docked to the space shuttle Atlantis, as the station’s robotic system moves the failed pump module (out of frame) over to the spacewalking astronaut and the shuttle’s cargo bay during a planned six-and-a-half-hour spacewalk on July 12, 2011. (credit: NASA via Getty Images)
(Nasa and Getty Images, again? is there something there?)

http://washington.cbslocal.com/2012/03/ ... e-station/


Whenever I look at any piece of info I always try & establish the possible intent behind its dissemination. It is possible they want us to believe that NASA is this stupid and incompetent for plausible deniability in case the ISS comes crashing down, and this may be blamed on China given all the accusations being hurled at them for hacking. In fact, they have actually been talking about deliberately crashing the ISS into the ocean, so this blunder is a convenient excuse for it.

Russia To Sink International Space Station In 2020

[ADMIN: Fixing broken links/images pass 01-14-2018 -HP]
Huffington Post broken link: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/07/2 ... 11361.html
Consider:
WAYBACK ARCHIVE: https://web.archive.org/web/20120306080 ... 11361.html
FOX: http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2011/07/27/ ... -2020.html
Washington Times: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/201 ... n-in-2020/
PHYS.org: https://phys.org/news/2011-07-iss-sunk- ... gency.html
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Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby Jonathan on Thu Mar 08, 2012 11:32 pm

some perspective on encryption:
The "problem" with it is that it is not a "cure all".
Besides encryption there are other ways to secure a system - and many, many ways to fail at this attempt at some point.
And someone will find that hole ...

If a system is up and running, it is not relevant whether the data on it's harddisks is encrypted or not.
While the system is running the encrypted data is needed and it is transparently decrypted and accessible just as if there was no harddisk encryption.
Such encryption is useful only in case of lost (and properly shut down) hardware - so that the contents then are not accessible without the key.
Still that key needs to be somewhere (smartcard, USB thumb-drive, human memory, a post it even ...) in order to get the system up and running, to decrypt the encrypted data.
If the laptop gets lost without the key, it's safe. If the key is somehow also available ... it's all of no use.

some perspective on ISS crashing down:
It's not "in case ..." but it's that it will come down eventually, that much is sure.
... they have actually been talking about deliberately crashing the ISS into the ocean ...

But of course.
The alternative to doing it controlled and deliberately would be to just let it sit there, slowly decaying, until it will eventually break up (or not...) but come down anyway, but this time noone can tell where or when.
Not doing it deliberately at some time when it has reached its end of life - now that would be unresponsible at the very least.
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Re: ENDEAVOUR - and the spaced-out NASA efforts

Unread postby reel.deal on Fri Mar 09, 2012 1:47 am


full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qIy0vglDWc

the nightskies stellar hot pixels look so dazzling & beautiful tonight...
;)
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