The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Questions, speculations & updates on the techniques and nature of media fakery
lux
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by lux » Fri Nov 02, 2012 12:47 am

Libero wrote:Did the technology exist in 1987 for a camera to get shots off so fast as those shown in the above portfolio?
A 35mm camera commonly used by photojournalists in 1987 was the Nikon F3 with MD-4 motor drive which was capable of 5.5 frames per second.
http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/ha ... /Index.htm

Libero
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by Libero » Fri Nov 02, 2012 12:57 am

Moreso, I wonder what the 'recovery' time would have been between shots. In at least two of the photos it would have to have been less than a second. For instance, try snapping a photo with your camera and then another as fast as you can right afterward. Since I am not a professional photographer, I don't know what technology is available to them or was available 25 years ago.

lux
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by lux » Fri Nov 02, 2012 1:12 am

With a motor driven camera you simple hold your finger down to take a sequence of photos.

Libero
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by Libero » Fri Nov 02, 2012 1:15 am

lux wrote:With a motor driven camera you simple hold your finger down to take a sequence of photos.
Got it. So, the technology would apparently support the speed that the photos were taken at and we can check that one off the list of my questions and observations. Thanks, Lux.


Incidentally, I decided to check the winners from 2001 on that same World Press site. 3rd place , same category was Richard Drew's photo of falling man. :D

http://www.archive.worldpressphoto.org/ ... /year/2001

Libero
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by Libero » Sat Nov 03, 2012 9:05 pm

Traversing back to the O.J. case, after their successful defense of "The Juice" it appears that 'The Dream Team' would all but abandon O.J. and he would obtain a new attorney named Yale Galanter to assist with with his upcoming series of unfortunate events.

"Galanter first represented O.J. Simpson in a road rage trial in October 2001. He was also Simpson's attorney for the federal drug raid case on Simpson's home in 2001, a misdemeanor boating violation in 2002, a domestic violence call to his residence in 2003, and his writing of a fictional account of the murders of his former wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ronald Goldman, called If I Did It."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yale_Galanter

O.J.'s luck would finally run out however, one fateful day in Nevada as he was finally nabbed and eventually convicted of the charges of robbery, kidnapping, coercion, and conspiracy in a sports memorabilia case. His penalty you ask? Up to 33 years in state prison but eligible for parole in 9. :D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O._J._Simpson_robbery_case

No worries O.J. fans... last month it was announced that the judge is re-opening the case because the defendant may not have been adequately represented.

http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/85256 ... oj-simpson

The O.J. Simpson saga -- the media gift that keeps on giving. :rolleyes: <_<


I noticed that Mr. Galanter also appears to represent both Charlie Sheen and his ex-wife Brooke Mueller during their 'meltdown' phases. Hmm...
Last edited by Libero on Sat Nov 03, 2012 11:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

fbenario
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by fbenario » Sat Nov 03, 2012 11:07 pm

Libero wrote:I noticed that Mr. Galanter also appears to represent both Charlie Sheen and his ex-wife Brooke Mueller during their 'meltdown' phases. Hmm...
As a lawyer I'd have to say that such a situation looks like one gigantic conflict of interest (giving it an almost automatic suspicion of an ethical violation), and any smart lawyer, acting in good faith, would sprint away from such a situation as fast as he could.

He'd also do well to remember the old adage that, "Caesar's wife much not only be above suspicion; she must appear to be above suspicion".

Libero
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by Libero » Wed Nov 07, 2012 8:33 pm

One of the more interesting witnesses to come out of the O.J. Simpson murder trial was forensic scientist, Henry Lee. Here's a bit of info on Mr. Lee.

"He currently has a TV show on the truTV network, which was Court TV back then, titled Trace Evidence: The Case Files of Dr. Henry Lee, which highlights his work on many well-known cases."


"Famous cases

He has worked on famous cases such as the JonBenét Ramsey murder, the Helle Crafts woodchipper murder, the O.J. Simpson and Laci Peterson cases, the post-9/11 forensic investigation, the Washington, DC sniper shootings and to reinvestigate the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

Dr. Lee investigated the 3-19 Shooting Incident of R.O.C. President Chen Shui-bian and Vice President Annette Lu.

Following the O.J. Simpson case, Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr hired Dr. Henry Lee to join his investigation of the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, who killed himself in Fort Marcy Park on 20 July 1993.

He also was consulted on the 1991 death of investigative journalist Danny Casolaro. Initially, Lee said the evidence presented to him by police was consistent with suicide, but when additional evidence was revealed to him a few years later, Dr. Lee formally withdrew his earlier statement.

Dr. Lee was consulted as a blood spatter analyst during the trial of Michael Peterson, a fiction writer and politician from North Carolina who, in 2003, was convicted of the murder of his wife, Kathleen Peterson.

In 2008, Dr. Henry Lee was involved in the early stages of investigation for the missing Orlando toddler, Caylee Anthony."


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Lee_ ... ientist%29


Another forensic pathologist witness who ended up making it into the media after the O.J. trial was Michael Baden. Here is a bit of info on him.

"...known for his work investigating high-profile deaths and as a host of HBO's Autopsy"


" Chairman of the Forensic Pathology Panel of the House Select Committee on Assassinations that reinvestigated the John F. Kennedy assassination.
Giving testimony at the trial of O. J. Simpson.
Investigating the remains of Czar Nicholas II and family members.[2]
Sid Vicious's death.
Claus von Bülow's criminal trial.
John Belushi's death.
Lisa McPherson's death.[6]
As a defense witness in Phil Spector's murder trial. He was reportedly paid $250,000.[7] Baden's wife was legal co-counsel for Spector at the time.[4]
Richard Kuklinski's death.
Kathleen Savio's death.
Sergeant Evan Vela's court martial.[8]
Gathering evidence against Byron De La Beckwith, who was facing his third trial for murder in the death of Medgar Evers. De La Beckwith was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Baden "

Libero
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by Libero » Thu Nov 08, 2012 6:31 am

Christopher Darden was another one of the prosecuting attorneys of the O.J. murder case and appears to be another to join the spotlight of the media and additionally authored a few books after the case concluded.

"Darden is a former legal commentator for CNN, Court TV, NBC and CNBC, and a frequent guest and commentator on CNN, Fox News Network and Court TV.[citation needed] He has appeared on every major television news or talk show. He has made guest appearances on Touched by an Angel, Girlfriends, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Muppets Tonight, Roseanne, and the movie Liar Liar. He is the former principal attorney in the syndicated legal show Power of Attorney."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Darden

Libero
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by Libero » Thu Nov 08, 2012 8:32 pm

So when the 'really bad guys' are eventually caught, tried and convicted they have to go somewhere. What better place than Federal prison? For this post, specifically we'll give note to a United States penitentiary administrative maximum facility (ADX) -- a federal supermax prison for male inmates located in the city of Florence in Fremont County, Colorado.

"The facility is best known for housing inmates who have been deemed too dangerous, too high-profile or too great a national security risk for even a maximum-security prison. These include the leaders of violent gangs who continued to issue orders to their members from lower security facilities, including Larry Hoover of the Gangster Disciples, and Barry Mills and Tyler Bingham of the Aryan Brotherhood. ADX also houses foreign terrorists, including the only person convicted in civilian court of the September 11 attacks, Zacarias Moussaoui, and the 1993 World Trade Center bombing mastermind Ramzi Yousef; as well as domestic terrorists, including serial bombers Ted Kaczynski and Eric Rudolph. Timothy McVeigh, who carried out the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, was housed at ADX before he was sentenced to death in 1997 and transferred to the United States Penitentiary, Terre Haute, which houses federal death row inmates. McVeigh's co-conspirator, Terry Nichols, is currently serving a life sentence at ADX. Robert Hanssen, the former FBI agent who betrayed several spies to the Soviet Union and Russia, is serving a life sentence at ADX for his crimes. The prison also houses inmates who are a high escape risk, including Richard McNair, who escaped from a county jail and two other prisons before being sent to ADX."


Many more occupants are listed in the Wiki including 'Shoe Bomber', Richard Reid and 'Underwear Bomber', Umar Abdulmuttalab.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ADX_Florence


While it would be great if a member from Colorado could pay a visit any of these 'occupants' and obtain an autograph, it appears that some of them are in 23 hour solitary confinement with 1 hour out, so I'm not sure that the odds would be all that great. ^_^ As if they would have been anyway... :D
Last edited by Libero on Fri Nov 09, 2012 2:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

Libero
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by Libero » Thu Nov 08, 2012 10:09 pm

This News just in --

Jared Lee Loughner Pleads Guilty.

"Loughner pleaded guilty under an agreement that guarantees he will spend the rest of his life in prison without the possibility of parole. He avoids a federal death sentence, and local prosecutors said Thursday they would not seek state charges."

"It's unclear where Loughner will be sent to serve his federal sentence. He could return to a prison medical facility like the one in Springfield, Mo., where he's been treated for more than a year. Or he could end up in a prison such as the federal lockup in Florence, Colo., that houses some of the country's most notorious criminals, including Oklahoma City bombing conspirator Terry Nichols and "Unabomber" Ted Kaczynski."

http://news.yahoo.com/life-sentence-ari ... 58574.html

Bets anyone? :D
Last edited by Libero on Tue Nov 13, 2012 12:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

Libero
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by Libero » Sun Nov 11, 2012 1:18 pm

From the Yahoo article above, and not entirely sure if it means anything, but I thought that the paragraph noting his 'sentence' was very strange.

"Loughner was then ordered to serve the seven consecutive life sentences, plus 140 years in federal prison for the shootings that killed six people and wounded 13, including Giffords, as she met with constituents in a Tucson shopping plaza"

7 (life sentences) + 7 (score (140 years)) + 6 (killed) + 13 (wounded) = 33

Libero
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by Libero » Mon Nov 12, 2012 7:36 pm

Not long after the O.J. murder trial and his successful acquittal, the families of the victims brought suit in civil court against O.J. for the wrongful deaths of their respectful loved ones. Unlike the murder case, this time the civil suit was successful -- to the tune of a verdict of 33 million dollars to be paid by the defendant to the families.

"While Simpson was found not guilty of the double murder in 1995, he was later found liable for wrongful death in a civil case - which requires a much lower standard - and was ordered to pay $33 million to the victim’s families."

http://www.examiner.com/article/o-j-sim ... der-weapon


The Goldman family was, naturally, eager to get their compensation from O.J. , even going so far as trying to obtain O.J.'s right to publicity. In the ABC article below from 2006 we can see that Judge Linda Lefkowitz was still making decisions on how to handle matters, but in the TruTV article, we will also discover that it was this same judge that originally issued the search warrant for O.J.'s house to the lead detective during the original murder case.

ABC article:
"Judge Linda Lefkowitz tentatively rejected Goldman's request, but it was not immediately clear when she would issue an official ruling in the case."

http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?secti ... id=4669130

TruTV article:
"At about 11:00 a.m., Phil Vannatter returned to South Bundy, having drafted out a search warrant on Simpson's home, and having it checked, approved and signed off by Judge Linda Lefkowitz at the West Los Angeles municipal courthouse. "

http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/noto ... rve_4.html

Libero
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by Libero » Sat Nov 17, 2012 5:12 am

TruTV -- Not Reality. Actuality.

That is their slogan.

I have been looking through their Crime Library today (check in various links under 'categories' to the right from link below.) Once you accept that media fakery is indeed real, I have a tingly suspicion that this is the go-to reference to confirm your suspicions on a given story (i.e. if it is there and they are mentioning it, you are almost certainly right :) ). They appear to add new stories every day from that start page that are almost certainly 'not reality' as well. It's obviously not a complete list through all of history, but it's a heck of a lot of info and a most excellent start.

http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/index.html

Edit: If you are still doubting or wondering about any of the particular entries, make sure to check the court case and related players, SSDI etc. Some victims may show up there but many don't. With every page that I go back and examine of stories on their updated main page, I am more confident that each story and/or entry in their Crime library is a source of fakery presented as 'actuality.'

SSDI
http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=3693

Libero
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by Libero » Tue Nov 20, 2012 10:20 pm

The "The Black Dahlia" murder of 1947 -- boy has that one been hammered home in various books, movies, newspapers etc. since Elizabeth Short's mutilated body was found one fateful day in Los Angeles. A simple examination of the timeline and related events leads me to conclude that the likeliness of it ever having happened is extremely, almost laughably slim. Feel free to skip to my summation at the bottom if you don't want to bother with the dreary details.

1. From La Examiner Wiki

"Examiner reporter Will Fowler was on another assignment with photographer Felix Paegel on January 15, 1947, when they heard a radio call of a mutilated female body found in a vacant lot on Norton Avenue in the Leimert Park area of Los Angeles."

"Fowler and Paegel arrived before police and observed the body. Fowler claimed in his autobiography that he knelt down to close Short's eyes before Paegel began shooting pictures."

"Whatever the facts were, the morning Examiner scooped the other Los Angeles newspapers by publishing an extra edition two hours before any of the afternoon newspapers hit the streets."

2. "By the late afternoon of January 15, an autopsy on Short was completed by the Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office. The victim's fingerprints were scheduled to be airmailed to the FBI fingerprint identification division in Washington, D.C. Examiner Assistant Managing Editor Warden Woolard suggested to Los Angeles police Capt. Jack Donahoe, who was chief of the department’s homicide division, that the victim’s fingerprints be transmitted to the FBI by using the Examiner's new Soundphoto machine. During the early morning hours of January 16, the International News Photo wire service received the prints via photo transmission from the Examiner. Soon afterward, the FBI identified the victim as Elizabeth Short."

3. "In the early afternoon of January 16 an Examiner extra hit the streets, again beating the competition. The Examiner identified Short and provided details of her life growing up in Massachusetts, and details of her adult life in Santa Barbara and later in Los Angeles. The Examiner noted that Short had lived in Los Angeles for a period of time before moving to various other cities in the pursuit of jobs and men. She returned to Los Angeles in 1946 and lived in hotels and rooming houses while visiting a man she had met while living in Florida."


1. From the TruTV article

"FBI technicians compared the prints with 104 million fingerprints they had on file, and quickly made a match to one Elizabeth Short. Short's fingerprints were taken for a mail room job she'd had at an army base in California — and for an arrest record for underage drinking in Santa Barbara."

2. "The FBI also sent the paper Short's government application photo. When reporters saw how attractive the 22-year-old victim was, they knew they had a sensational tale on their hands."

"This was news noir at its best. To juice up the story, Examiner reporters resorted to an unethical ploy; they called her mother, Phoebe Short, and told her that her daughter had won a beauty contest. After prying as much personal information about Elizabeth from Mrs. Short as possible, they informed her that that her daughter was actually dead."

3. "The five daily papers in Los Angeles gobbled up these details in a ferocious competition to outscoop each other. Someone — possibly the killer — mailed a package to the Examiner nine days after Short's death. It reeked of the gasoline the sender used to erase his or her fingerprints from the envelope. Inside were Short's belongings, including photographs, her birth certificate, social security card, and Matt Gordon's obituary.

1. From the Wiki on Elizabeth Short.

"On January 25, Short's handbag and one shoe were reported seen on top of a garbage can in an alley a short distance from Norton Avenue, and then finally located at the dump"



So here is my short summation based on just the items above:


On January 15, a reporter and photographer happen to be working on a different story in the area, intercept a broadcast meant for the police, and arrive at the scene before the police can get there so that they can snap their pictures and break the story. Later that same evening, the LA Coroner finishes up the autopsy, planned on sending the fingerprints to the FBI via airmail, but the newspaper offers up its '1947 based fax machine' to zap the prints on over to the FBI the next morning. That morning of the 16th, out of 104 million finger prints , the FBI almost immediately identifies them (using what as technology??) and immediately contacts the newspaper back about its findings, along with extra information they didn't even ask for. The newspaper appears to deduce right away as to who the relatives must be of this victim, call the mother and punk her out of the information on her daughter, and then tell her... 'Oh by the way, your daughter is really dead, but thanks for the info. " Later that afternoon, they already have a newspaper ready to go out with the information they have just obtained from the mother. Add some stuff mysteriously sent to the newspaper a week later, a shoe and a purse found in a trash bin and now we have a real murder mystery on our hands.

I thought I would also add that Elizabeth Short was reported to have had a Social Security card as noted in the items sent to the newspaper, but she is not in the Social Security Death Database Index.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Angele ... d-Examiner
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Short
http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/noto ... dex_1.html

Libero
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Re: The Many Things That Make You Go Hmm...

Unread post by Libero » Wed Nov 21, 2012 1:24 am

Just for grins and giggles, I thought I would add the Wiki on a detective involved in the 'Black Dahlia' case that seemingly could not put two-and-two together as I did in the post above.

One of his first assignments was the notorious Black Dahlia murder,[2] a case he worked on-and-off until his retirement in 1993. [1] His nickname, Jigsaw John, originated in his early career with a dismemberment murder he solved in Griffith Park in which the victim had been cut up jigsaw-style. The moniker caught on because of his ability to piece clues together in difficult cases, resulting in many arrests and convictions.[3] He became an authority on serial murders and worked 12 of them, including the 1950s serial killer Harvey Glatman, Night Stalker Richard Ramirez, the Hillside Stranglers, the Southside Slayer, and the William Bonin Freeway Killer case.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_P._St ... tective%29


Mr. St. John has unfortunately passed. But here are a few notable folks that attended his funeral.

His funeral was a veritable “Who's Who” of LAPD’s powerful and famous, including O. J. Simpson detectives Tom Lange and Philip Vannatter, as well as Judge Lance Ito, who presided over the Simpson criminal trial. LAPD’s then Chief Willie L. Williams and his predecessor, Chief Darryl F. Gates (who worked with him as a young detective), eulogized him, Williams reinstating the detective to active duty as of May 2, 1995 “That he make his final journey as a detective of the Los Angeles Police Department."[12]


Darryl Gates, by the way, worked the Manson case earlier on in his career.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daryl_Gates

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