THE "CHATBOX"

A place to relax and socialize - to muse, think aloud and suggest

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby simonshack on Thu Nov 01, 2012 10:52 pm

*

If you ever wonder what keeps my spirits high and strong - (we all need to laugh about our current predicament as mere passengers of this spaceship/planet ruled by rogue, warmongering captains), here's a funny exchange I just had on Youtube - of all places ! :lol:

Now, I consider myself as a humble and unassuming human being - but/and yes, I'm human enough to appreciate and get a little kick out of fellow human beings' encouragements!


Simon Shack needs a nomination for the Nobel Peace prize !
carol tenge 3 hours ago


Thanks for your kind thought! I would gladly accept the NPP - although there's only a very slim chance of this ever happening - since the current folks in my fatherland (Norway) heading the Nobel committee ... seem to be a bunch of brainless, war-supporting clowns :

Nobel Peace Prize recipient for 2009: Barack H. Obama (!)

Nobel Peace Prize recipient for 2012: The European Union (!!)

For sure, I'd say that it would be a step in the right direction to give the next one to me! :-)

simonshack 1 second ago


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gORu-68SHpE

I love you, Carol! :wub:


**************
Having said that, take a look at this horrid list of Nobel Peace Prize recipients:
http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/

1973: Henry Kissinger !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :puke: :puke: :puke:
simonshack
Administrator
 
Posts: 6711
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2009 8:09 pm
Location: italy

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby brianv on Fri Nov 02, 2012 12:27 am

The European Union?? My God! There you go, I've said it!

How can a fictictious entity be awared a prize?

Give the European Union a slap! Can't be done! It doesn't exist, it's merely an idea in the minds of certain cretins.

An idea has been awarded a prize. "There you go Mr Idea, please accept this prize on behalf of the Nobel Institution", itself a fictitious entity.

What a charade!
brianv
Member
 
Posts: 3959
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2009 10:19 pm

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby Heiwa on Fri Nov 02, 2012 3:46 am

The European Union (EU) is a unique economic and political union of 27 member states which are located primarily in Europe with some bits and pieces in South America and the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. Only states can be members. No person represents EU, so no person can receive the prize at Oslo.
Heiwa
Banned
 
Posts: 1062
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2009 6:20 pm

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby brianv on Fri Nov 02, 2012 12:06 pm

Heiwa wrote:The European Union (EU) is a unique economic and political union of 27 member states which are located primarily in Europe with some bits and pieces in South America and the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. Only states can be members. No person represents EU, so no person can receive the prize at Oslo.


The "European Union" is a piece of paper!

edit: How terribly dogmatic of me. X=Y bah. One possible correction might appear thus :

In my opinion the circus known as the "European Union" exists only on paper. There, that's better.
Last edited by brianv on Fri Nov 02, 2012 10:15 pm, edited 2 times in total.
brianv
Member
 
Posts: 3959
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2009 10:19 pm

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby agraposo on Fri Nov 02, 2012 8:21 pm

simonshack wrote:Having said that, take a look at this horrid list of Nobel Peace Prize recipients:
http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/

The Nobel Peace Prize 1985
International Physicians for the Prevention of (faked) Nuclear War :D :o
http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1985/
agraposo
Member
 
Posts: 267
Joined: Fri Jun 10, 2011 9:48 pm

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby simonshack on Fri Nov 02, 2012 9:47 pm

agraposo wrote:The Nobel Peace Prize 1985
International Physicians for the Prevention of (faked) Nuclear War :D :o
http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1985/


Lol :lol:

And how very ironic that the symbol we all know as the "PEACE SYMBOL"...

Image

...apparently originated within the Nuclear Disarmament Movement - (designed by one Gerald Holtom) :

"There is one icon of peace whose creation and origins can be traced with complete confidence - this is the emblem that people of my age and movement background in Britain refer to as the “disarmament symbol” or the “CND symbol” (after the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament). For people outside the nuclear disarmament movement in Britain, it is more commonly referred to as “the peace symbol”, and is generally perceived as emblematic of all kinds of cultural dissent. Perhaps one clue to the popularity of this symbol is its simplicity - a verticalline bisecting a circle and supported by an inverted “v”.
http://peacenews.info/node/3598/sign-times
simonshack
Administrator
 
Posts: 6711
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2009 8:09 pm
Location: italy

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby brianv on Fri Nov 02, 2012 10:48 pm

Image
brianv
Member
 
Posts: 3959
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2009 10:19 pm

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby icarusinbound on Sat Nov 03, 2012 12:50 am

simonshack wrote:
And how very ironic that the symbol we all know as the "PEACE SYMBOL"...



Hmm, 'peace' symbol......I'd say it's origins could be just as much from war.

Image
(Search in Google Images for 'Broadarrow')

I'd heard all this questionable back-story about the design 'peace symbol', including bizarrely it being based upon the semaphore letters 'N' and 'D' superimposed, and the Gerald Holtom details, but a simple alternative genesis for it is just that it is a stylised mis-stamped UK/Commonwealth Government Property 'broadarrow' badge. All weapons/explosives/prisoners' uniforms, even many stone signs at British owned-or-originated government buildings, had an arrow stamp/print or engraving upon them, from the 1600s almost up to the present day.

Equally, aside from the ring, the full arrow/crow's foot design has mason-mark significance, and was/is a scandinavian rune letter of varying letter value.
Image
(plenty of fascist borrowed symbology here)

To me, if the symbol has any true archetypal meaning in a genuine disarmament context, it has to emerge from the circular shape (representing the globe of the world), the centre line (a meridian, indicating solid/iron division between the east and west), and the equal/opposing 'supporters inclined to support' each side of that meridian. I wonder- did it truly become designed as an emergent revelation of deep symbolic meaning?

It also fits the bill perfectly as a uberlang protograph...kids and cavemen of all cultures will score/scribe/scratch stick+ball+stick. Then the stick+ball becomes to look like the sun, mummy, sunflowers, and, then eventually, convincing media back-stories.
icarusinbound
Member
 
Posts: 393
Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2011 8:49 am

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby hoi.polloi on Sun Nov 04, 2012 12:08 pm

Hi, everyone. I just finished transcribing my entire copy of Bill Kaysing's book We Never Went To The Moon.

Please read it here, when you find the time: viewtopic.php?f=23&t=1477&start=15

Thanks!
hoi.polloi
Administrator
 
Posts: 5058
Joined: Sun Nov 14, 2010 7:24 pm

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby Mercurial on Mon Nov 05, 2012 1:22 pm

Wow, thanks Hoi. Kaysings book is an amazing read. I have just been through it all and made notes of the very few typos contained within. Will write up later and post, for now I have to make a cake for my kid's birthday - got to get my priorities straight!! :P
Mercurial
Member
 
Posts: 121
Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 12:23 am

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby hoi.polloi on Mon Nov 05, 2012 3:07 pm

Thank you, I do not want any of my typos to taint the text. Kaysing's are plentiful enough as it is! :P

Do enjoy the cake process and don't come back until you've had a lot of fun first. :D
hoi.polloi
Administrator
 
Posts: 5058
Joined: Sun Nov 14, 2010 7:24 pm

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby Mercurial on Mon Nov 05, 2012 9:28 pm

Little miss in bed now. She had a great time and way too many presents. The cake was rather good if not a bit on the rich side! Okay here goes, I hope this is easy enough to follow all right. (I'm sure I've missed some - I usually do a few read throughs to pick up everything - I hope this is useful for now. Let's get these done and I'll go over it again in a couple of days).

Chapter 2

Indonesia: – “…revel airstrip…” should read “…rebel airstrip….”


Chapter 5

1st para, 2nd line
“…amny fine trysting places…” should read “…many fine…”

11th para (beginning “And so the modern personification…”) 1st line
“…reamined on for almost six months…” should read “…remained on…”


Chapter 8

Technical Areas (first grey quote box)
2nd para, 1st line

“…just borth of Mercury… “ should read “…north of…”

2nd line

“ad” should read “and”

3rd line

“confuced” should read “confused”

4th line

“materiel” should read “material”

Beginning of 3rd para

Yucca Flat, a… - underline continues too far (yeah, I know, so what - but pedantry’s the name of the game!!!)

And again three lines later with Rainer Mesa (the underline is taking in the spaces either side)


5th para (beginning “Two additional testing…”, 4th line

Just a style thing really but I would remove the apostrophes from 1950s and 1960s

And again with 1950s in the last line of that para


Probably me being witless, but I wasn’t really understanding the bit in your note about today's salary gap when you say “… assessing their taxes or doubt”

Under 8th subheader after the list in grey quote box

Visual Presentations

3rd para, 2nd line

“…far-randing…” should read “…far-ranging…”


Two sections later – Television Broadcasts

Should that start “Unquestionably” ?


In the appendix for Chapter 8

L + 2 hour, last line

“…cleared for secret, of course” should that be “secrecy” – not sure but it reads oddly.


Chapter 9

Second section – Leased Phone Connections

2nd line

Again a style thing really – but I’d remove the space before the colon


Chapter 10

The p 320 quote needs a space after the question mark towards end of first line.


Chapter 11

3rd subhead – Apollo as a Disaster…

4th para

Think the quote should start “The state’s power lies…” (lose “The hear of”)


4th para up from end of Chapter 11 beginning “In 1965, the Air Force…”

end of 3rd line

“Had this been down…” should read “done”



After Epilog

In section titled The Doctor of Minneapolis

2nd line there’s a space before a colon


Additional Facts as of 11-29-76

1st line Barron Report should be Baron Report

(Interesting aside: the Barron Report by Justice Henry Barron confirmed British collusion in 1974’s Dublin and Monaghan bombings)


5th para Barron v Baron again.


Oh and just in your last comment you’ve missed an “it”, 3rd line “…when you think about…”

***

Back to Chapter 2 - I don’t think the term lily-white is archaic – I use it. (Haha, perhaps I am too then!)
The 3rd usage below is a bit shudder – never seen that before - maybe that’s why it’s not used so much as a term in the States in these days:

(should be hyphenated, I think)

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/lily-white

1.
white as a lily: soft lily-white skin.
2.
pure; untouched by corruption or imperfection; above reproach: He tries to pass himself off as some sort of lily-white saint, but he's not.
3.
designating or pertaining to any faction, organization, or group opposing the inclusion of blacks, especially in political or social life.
Mercurial
Member
 
Posts: 121
Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 12:23 am

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby reichstag fireman on Mon Nov 05, 2012 10:11 pm

Thank you very much for typing in all Kaysing's text, Hoi Polloi. Would it be very wrong to turn it into a PDF for easy downloading and printing?
reichstag fireman
Member
 
Posts: 466
Joined: Wed May 16, 2012 1:09 am

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby Mercurial on Tue Nov 06, 2012 12:58 am

The Ultra Secret clip in chapter 2 put me in mind of this:

The West End Front: The Wartime Secrets of London’s Grand Hotels

THE NIGHT BEFORE the lights went out, Victor Legg was the loneliest man in London. He clocked off in the early hours of the first day of September 1939, but he did not go home. Instead, he walked. He went east, past Fortnum and Mason, where the windows were already crossed with sticky tape and the walls banked with sandbags. He struck out across Piccadilly Circus, through the insomniac streets of Soho and into Covent Garden, where he found an all-night Italian café; one of those places where signs on the walls warned customers that they were not permitted to sleep on the premises. He sat. He smoked. He ordered bacon sandwiches and coffee. And he waited for the world to know what he knew.

The West End was brighter that night than it would be for a decade. On the canyon wall of hoardings above Piccadilly Circus, the vanishing pleasures of peacetime were described in light. A neon Austin Morris motored on an open road of glowing lines. A burning sign proclaimed the superiority of the Ecko television set – the best receiver for a service that was doomed to go dark the following lunchtime. Above them all, the Guinness clock measured out its last few illuminated hours. And on the grand Edwardian building from which Victor had begun this solitary journey the bulbs also glowed, picking out its name in blackout blue.

Victor Legg joined the nocturnal population of the Ritz in late 1935. He turned up at the back door of the hotel in search of work and, much to his surprise, was ushered into the presence of the assistant manager, a hard-headed Swiss named Edouard Schwenter. Schwenter asked him if he had any experience of hotels. Victor replied that he had worked behind the reception desk of the Berkeley, a smaller, older establishment on the other side of Piccadilly – but omitted to mention that he had been given the sack. Schwenter enquired whether he could operate a telephone switchboard. Victor confirmed that he could, which was not quite a lie. Schwenter then asked if he could speak French. Here, the truth was unavoidable. The assistant manager made a show of disappointment, then gave him the job on the spot. It was only when he began his first shift that Victor understood the nature of this generosity. Schwenter had a lover who often called the hotel. French was the language of their adultery. The new telephonist was quite unable to understand its breathless details.

Every evening at seven o’clock, Victor went to the topmost floor of the hotel and took his place in a hot little room a few doors down from the resident hairdresser. Here, lights pulsed insistently, operators demanded attention and, with a Bakelite headset clamped to his ear, he slotted jacks into sockets and connected the callers to the called. At ten o’clock on the last night of August 1939, a brisk military voice asked to be put through to the Grill Room. Victor obeyed, transferring the call to Kaneledis, the basement cloakroom attendant – but kept the switchboard key in the forward position, allowing him to eavesdrop on the conversation. The caller asked if Randolph Churchill was in the building. Kaneledis had little trouble confirming his presence. Churchill was the son of one of Britain’s most prominent politicians – and so notorious for his foul-mouthed intolerance of hotel staff that waiters bribed each other in order to avoid serving him. “He’s in the bar,” replied the attendant. “May I ask who is calling?” The voice on the end of the line gave a sharp response: “You may not.” A few moments later, Churchill had the receiver in his hand.
“Randy?” asked the caller.
“Yes?”
“The Germans bomb Warsaw tomorrow morning. Nine o’clock.”
The significance of this exchange was not lost on Victor. It was as good as a declaration of war; confirmation that Neville Chamberlain’s policy of Appeasement had reached its endgame; a signal that history had clicked back round to 1914. As soon as Churchill had rung off, Victor put through a call to a friend who worked at the BBC. Before he could communicate the news, however, he heard another voice on the line. “Operator,” it said, “I’d be careful what you repeat.” The line fell silent. Victor followed suit. He spent an uneasy night in that hot little room at the top of the Ritz, reflecting on this unfriendly warning and wondering when the security services had begun tapping the phones. At the end of his shift, he was relieved to step out into Piccadilly, walk through the quiet West End streets, settle himself at his favourite table at Elena Giacopazzi’s café near the Theatre Royal and work his way through several pots of coffee and a packet of Craven ‘A’. At 10.30 he walked out to the newspaper stand by Covent Garden tube station and bought a copy of the morning edition of the Star. The headlines carried no news of any bombardment. He flipped to the back page, which bore a gloomy announcement about the cancellation of Saturday’s races at Northolt Park, and scanned the list of the runners and riders scheduled to churn the turf in Manchester that afternoon. Two, he noted, were the property of the Aga Khan, the millionaire Imam, diplomat and Ritz resident, on whose horses the hotel staff placed loyal bets. The Star kept the right-hand column of the page blank to list the names of last-minute withdrawals from the field. But the international crisis had obliged its editor to stop the press in acknowledgement of something graver than a waterlogged course or a bruised fetlock: a line cabled by a reporter from the British United Press agency, confirming that at nine o’clock that morning, 90 minutes before the Star hit the stands, the outskirts of Warsaw had felt the impact of a rain of Luftwaffe incendiaries. Half an hour later, the story had already migrated to the front page: “Danzig proclaims return to the Reich,” boomed the paper. “Germans bomb Polish town.”

By the time I met Victor Legg, two years before his death in 2007, his name had become synonymous with the Ritz. It was an institution to which he had given half a century of his life. He had retired in 1976, but his conversation remained thickly populated with plutocrats and earls and novelists and monarchs. He showed me a letter from Jackie Onassis, thanking him for rescuing her son from a makeshift bed on a bench in Green Park. He produced typewritten pages by Graham Greene – one a three-stanza elegy commemorating Victor’s long service to the hotel, the other a letter complaining about the sausages. He spoke of nights spent gambling with a prominent Israeli arms dealer; singing nonsense songs with the economist J. K. Galbraith; gassing with the Queen Mother. The story of this sleepless night in 1939 was one of his stock anecdotes. He had probably told it a thousand times. And yet, almost seven decades after the event, his beady blue eyes still betrayed the impact of that triple shock: a prediction of war, a mysterious reprimand and a prophecy fulfilled beside a list of the runners in the 2.30 at Castle Irwell. “It frightened the life out of me,” he admitted. “How could the War Office have known it all in advance?” Two days later, Chamberlain issued the news that most people had been anticipating for months: Britain was at war with Germany. “We thought that was that,” recalled Victor. “What use is the Ritz in the middle of a war?”
Mercurial
Member
 
Posts: 121
Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 12:23 am

Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread postby brianv on Tue Nov 06, 2012 11:58 am

reichstag fireman wrote:Thank you very much for typing in all Kaysing's text, Hoi Polloi. Would it be very wrong to turn it into a PDF for easy downloading and printing?


As one doesn't seem to be available on the web, it might not be a bad idea!
brianv
Member
 
Posts: 3959
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2009 10:19 pm

PreviousNext

Return to THE LIVING ROOM

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests