THE "CHATBOX"

A place to relax and socialize - to muse, think aloud and suggest
SacredCowSlayer
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by SacredCowSlayer » Mon Sep 02, 2019 3:22 am

Pokerniko » September 1st, 2019, 12:35 pm wrote:Something strange about yesterday last shooting hoax in Midland/Odessa area, on august 15th a post on FB was claiming about a shooting taking place in the same exact area of Midland/Odessa, police warned it was a hoax:

https://www.cbs7.com/content/news/Weeke ... 83831.html

What are the odds?
Oh, there is a full-blown scamathon (re “mass shootings” in particular) in full progress here in Texas as of late. It’s just pathetic.

Hopefully that will all get fleshed out further here on CF soon enough. Perhaps we (or most of us) are experiencing some hoax fatigue.

VonCrowne
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by VonCrowne » Tue Sep 03, 2019 3:17 am

Peter on September 2nd, 2019: By "hoax info" I was talking about "coming clean" ie the illuminati telling us that some event or other was a hoax. (Always with some disinfo but so what, the main thing is they are uncovering things for us). First they told us (the few who could see) about Apollo, 911, and then so on until now when they are revealing the secret trans caste.
Upwards to 95% of the masses will never accept the conspiracy, that is, without compartmentalizing it to this group or the other being responsible. In that case, to present these things - with the establishment's own interpretation- keeps the small percentile in line. As you said, "always, with some disinfo".
I have been unraveling the "vast Jewish conspiracy" for the last two years - pounding away at both the old and new literature available; it is unsettling, particularly, when you realize the scope of what is and has been revealed. When one understands, now, the power that this establishment wields, the world over, it makes no sense that so much damning information has escaped onto the web, in the public domain, for free.
My fastidious nature demands that I must not be led down a wrong path, again, for the hundredth time, particularly, before making public comment concerning such. Otherwise, I have a hundred (or more) pages of notes that I would have been glad to share with Cluesforum - but it's too easy, this information didn't escape onto the web, without purpose.
There is a deep game being played here, my friend.

antipodean
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Re: On the Viability of Conspiratorial Beliefs

Unread post by antipodean » Wed Sep 04, 2019 12:02 pm

How Katherine Keating blasted into billionaire paedophile Epstein's orbit
https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/ce ... 52j1t.html

It looks as though I made a mistake in a previous post.
The brunet carrying the white bag with the white shoulder strap is a different woman to the brunet leaving at the end waving to Prince Andrew. It looks as though the brunet with the white bag is Sarah Kellen one of Epstein's madams. The woman waving to Prince Andrew is Katherine Keating.
I've now found a photo of Katherine Keating's step sister (ex Australian Prime Minister Paul Keating's step daughter) Gigi Penna taken about 8 years later, she could well be the blond girl in the video.
Image

full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhBMT72iAVw

Edit : Thanks mods for deleting my previous post and moving it here.

Flabbergasted
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by Flabbergasted » Fri Sep 06, 2019 3:09 am

The introduction (or imposition) of the Copernican model of the solar system back in the 17th century raised a stormy controversy, not simply because the new paradigm was untestable, but because something other than geometry and optics was at stake. The proposed shift in world-view, moving man from pole to satellite, from heart to brain, contradicted man’s place in the ordered universe, the centrality (theomorphism) of the human being, man’s position as keeper of the Garden.

The shift in world-view facilitated the advent of what some Hindus have termed ‘the dark age’, with its (ir)rationalism, relativism, hedonism, apostasy, industrial revolution and totalitarian wars.

As convenient as it may seem to understand the geo/solar system simply as a clockwork in mathematical, geometric and optical terms, doing so amounts to reducing it to an impersonal, purposeless and unintelligble physical object. The following passages from Burckhardt’s “Moorish Culture in Spain” (1970) recalls the deeper meaning of geocentricity, which (to my knowledge) was the preferred world-view of all civilizations prior to modern Western Europe.
The Arab philosophers (and this includes all those whose works were written in Arabic) have often been accused with having inextricably woven Platonic elements into the Aristotelian heritage, which they passed on to the Christian West, as if by so doing they were guilty of misrepresentation. In reality, this ‘mingling’ for which they are censured represents a splendid work of adaptation, a synthesis in the true sense of the word without which the intellectual flowering of the Christian Middle Ages would have been inconceivable. The fertile union of intellectual discipline and contemplative spirit, for which the schools of Paris, Chartres, Oxford and Strasbourg (to name but a few) were renowned in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, is largely the outcome of that very same ‘mingling’ found in the works of the Arab al-Kindī and the Persians al-Fārābī (Alpharabius) and Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna), and their Spanish successors, such as Ibn Gabirol (Avicebron) and Ibn Bājja (Avempace). All these philosophers combined the strictly methodical thought of Aristotle, proceeding from premise to premise, with the contemplative Platonic approach which was directed immediately to the essence of things.

Obviously the Arab scholars were sometimes mistaken about the authorship of Greek doctrines. But what concerned the philosophers named above was not so much the question of which writings should be attributed to Plato or to Aristotle, as from which viewpoint one master or the other reasoned. For the Arabs were convinced that the great sages of antiquity did not simply construct a system of ideas, but that they set out from an immediate view of reality, so that any contradictions were simply like one and the same scene painted by two different artists. If we are familiar with the subject of the painting, it is possible to reconcile the apparent discrepancies of the different renderings. It was possible for the Arab scholars to reconcile Aristotelian philosophy with that of Plato because they themselves possessed a firm axis to which they could refer all fundamental views of reality. This axis was the doctrine of the oneness of God. Moreover, this doctrine had two facets: on the one hand, it maintains that God is unique and exalted above the entire universe, and, on the other, it implies that everything that exists necessarily partakes of divine being. There is only one being. Thus, although plurality springs from oneness, it never supplants it. There are manifold reflections of the one being, in that it appears by degrees increasingly fragmented, limited, and ephemeral and yet it still always remains one. The Arabs took the outlines of this doctrine largely from the metaphysics of Plotinus, although in essence it is set out in the Koran.

One fundamental ingredient of this doctrine is the hierarchical structure of the universe. Plurality in oneness and oneness in rnultiplicity -- this is the law of hierarchy.

An awareness that reality embraces countless different levels of existence was common to all the cultures of classical anhquity and the Middle Ages, whether this was expressed in mythological form or in terms of philosophy. That the whole of reality should consist of the physical world which can be comprehended by our five senses is a very recent concept, and one which is basically contradicted by any knowledge of oneself. For man readily discovers that the ‘stuff’, as it were, of which his soul is made is different from that of his body, and that for all its ties to the physical world, it possesses qualities that the body does not have, such as perception, thought and independent action. Endowed with these faculties, the soul is not, however, the only non-physical condition of human existence. For the soul, with its constant changes, is itself an object of recognition, and this presupposes that there is something like an inner eye that sees the soul, while itself remaining constant. This is the intellect in the medieval acceptance of the word. To try and comprehend it would be as hopeless as an attempt to see one’s own power of vision. It transcends thought, yet it lends all possible certainty to thought. All rational evidence would be nothing without the truths that are a direct ‘illumination’ from the intellect. The medieval philosophers refer to the ‘active intellect’ (intellectus agens in Latin, al-’aḳl al-fa’-āl in Arabic) because the intellect consists, as it were, of the pure act of recognition, and never itself becomes the passive object of perception.

For man, the soul is his inner being, and the intellect is the innermost part of that inner being. The physical world ‘outside’ him is, so to speak, received and transformed into something ‘inward’ by the sensory organs and the corresponding mental powers. Common sense, the sensus communis, collates the external impressions, imagination translates them into images, the intelligence sifts and presents them to the intellect, which makes the final distinction between true and false. Accordingly, the various conditions or layers of the human nature can be thought of in terms of a varying number of concentric circles, with the outer circle corresponding to the physical condition, and the center to the intellect.

The advantage of this formula, which was well-known to medieval philosophers, is that it illustrates the order of basic realities in the simplest way. However, its limitations, and its partial fallacy are immediately evident in that the very element representing supra-personal and universal truth (i.e., the intellect) appears as the smallest thing -- a mere point. The reason for this is that the entire scheme with its differentiation between ‘external’ and ‘internal’ is determined by an egocentric or ‘subjective’ outlook. As the object of perception, the physical world appears comprehensive to subjective experience, while the intellect, which is to the physical world as the source of light is to an illuminated room, appears as an elusive, unseeable point.

Image

But taking the different levels of reality, as revealed in man, not in their subjective role, but in their actual existence, it becomes plain that the higher level must include the lower, that which perceives must include the perceived, the universal must include the personal, and the free the less free. The applied formula can in fact be reversed: the intellect then corresponds to the outer circle in the diagram, because in its perception it encompasses everything (not in any spatial sense), just as the soul with its consciousness and its mental powers encompasses the body. This is the sense in which this system of concentric circles, one encompassing the next, was equally applied by the medieval philosophers. They saw in it not only a reflection of the essential structure of man, but of the entire universe, for the various stages of reality existed before the individual beings that share in it. Were the physical world not fundamentally, and by nature of its existence, included in the psychical world, there would be no perception, and the impressions that we receive of the external world would merely be so many random coincidences. And if the physical as well as the psychical world were not encompassed by the intellect, then there would be no universally valid recognition that surpasses the individual [therefore, no science either]. Thus we may refer not only to a physical universe, but also to a psychical and an intellectual universe, and to one encompassing another in metaphorical terms.

...The infinite space surrounding the outer circle on our diagram corresponds to divine knowledge. The outermost circle is itself the universal intellect, and the circles inscribed within it represent the universal soul and the entire physical world. In accordance with the teaching of Plotinus, universal nature is frequently inserted between the universal soul, which comprises the individual souls as the sea contains the waves, and the totality of the physical world. It is to the purely physical condition as is motivity to inert matter. The totality of physical existence is somehow designated by the all-encompassing celestial sphere. But within this, the hierarchy of different levels of existence is again repeated in the form of the planetary spheres, as they appear from earth. In this context Ibn Gabirol says: “Just as in its essence and form physical existence mirrors spiritual existence, so the enveloping nature of spiritual qualities corresponds to a physical envelopment, since the lower level is always an imitation of the higher one [...] Thus it may be said of the spiritual substance that it embraces the physical, because - by nature of its existence - the latter exists within it, in much the same way that all bodies exist within the one body of the firmament...”

This calls to mind Dante’s description of the heavenly spheres, and with reason, for in both there is the same vision of the cosmos that goes back through Avicenna to Plato, and even further. The orbits of the planets, which from the earth appear to move in ever-widening circles, offer a natural illustration of the levels of existence. The astronomic heavens do not themselves constitute these levels, but correspond to them, because physical existence, as Ibn Gabirol says, reflects spiritual existence; and Dante means the same thing when he says: “The physical orbits are wider or narrower, according to the measure of virtue distributed in all its parts [...] Therefore the greatest orbit, that includes the whole great universe, corresponds to the (spiritual) cycle that loves and recognizes most of all" (Paradiso XXVIII. 64-72).

The validity of this symbol does not depend on whether or not this geocentric view of the world, shared by Dante and the Arab philosophers, was scientifically accurate [Burckhardt died in 1984 and may not have been aware of the glaring inconsistencies of the Copernican model and the establishment’s desperate attempts to conceal them, as described in Simon’s book]. It is sufficient that it corresponds to a general human experience. Obviously, the assumption that the earth stands still and the planets revolve around it in greater or smaller orbits is based upon an optical illusion. However, this fallacy is, to some extent, inherent in the nature of man. It merely proves that our sensory perceptions are limited, that no ‘exact’ science, however advanced, will overcome this, and that something of an optical illusion will always cling. Yet, the more profound meaning of this geocentric view of the world is in its very symbolism. If the divine spirit envelops this world, not spatially, but by virtue of its own existence, then it is no fallacy to compare it with the all-embracing starless heaven, where even space comes to an end. And if this image is valid, then it is also true to regard the hierarchical order of the planets that appear to revolve in ever-widening orbits as an illustration of the super-terrestrial states of existence and consciousness. It is no coincidence that the planets are not only a source of light, but also a measure of time.
Image

It is also interesting to note that, in the astrological sense, our geo-heliocentric system may be divided into inner (lower) and outer (upper) planets, although there seems to be some disagreement about where Mars belongs. The first group is associated with the ‘concrete’ or ‘subjective’ liberal arts (the trivium), while the second group represents the ‘abstract’ or ‘objective’ liberal arts (the quadrivium). However, I see “the fourth art” (Sun) as the source of all the others. By doing so, we get two sets of attributes which mirror each other perfectly. As above, so below.

michiganj
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by michiganj » Tue Sep 10, 2019 12:29 am

Went to Las Vegas for the weekend to see Elton John's Farewell Yellow Brick Road concert. It was amazing!

The night before we were walking the strip, checking out the different hotels and came upon the Bellagio.
Inside was this beautiful display made with fresh flowers.

Image

Image

As I'm walking away, what do I catch from the corner of my eye but this shameless promotion for Omega watches.

Image

This is the last face I'd expect to see in Vegas. :huh:

Or this one.

Image

Otherwise, it was a great weekend. Here are the first two songs from the show.
Unfortunately, my phone didn't quite capture the awesome sound that filled the arena. http://sendvid.com/bop1ebai
elton2 - elton3 - elton4 - elton5

Kham
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by Kham » Sun Sep 15, 2019 8:52 pm

The following video features John Rose, a man who has spent considerable time gaining knowledge in many areas. Here he discusses government and its deceptive nature. I like how John organizes his thoughts into well defined patterns making it easier for me to re-tell his information.


full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WyeGFjm4noo

I find that John is quite a unique thinker and worthy of my attention.

Enjoy,

KHam

antipodean
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by antipodean » Mon Sep 16, 2019 8:11 am

I find that John is quite a unique thinker and worthy of my attention.

Enjoy,

KHam
Think I would have enjoyed it more if I was female. Rather than being reminded that I need to renew my Gymn membership.

patrix
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by patrix » Wed Sep 18, 2019 7:16 am

REQUEST:
Does anyone know where I can find the Hoax Busters Call episode where Chris(?) calls an official and asks about how many deaths that are registered in the US social security databases around 9/11 2001
EDIT: Found it https://archive.org/details/HBCWhereAre ... nistration
....
Interesting Kham. This makes a lot of sense (it's about limiting the number of meals per day and skipping breakfast)
https://youtu.be/evEKpfgnxD4?t=114
I do not however share any ideas about avoiding animal fats or proteins since they are essential nutrients for humans.

Peter
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by Peter » Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:53 pm

VonCrowne » September 3rd, 2019, 3:17 am wrote:
Peter on September 2nd, 2019: By "hoax info" I was talking about "coming clean" ie the illuminati telling us that some event or other was a hoax. (Always with some disinfo but so what, the main thing is they are uncovering things for us). First they told us (the few who could see) about Apollo, 911, and then so on until now when they are revealing the secret trans caste.
Upwards to 95% of the masses will never accept the conspiracy, that is, without compartmentalizing it to this group or the other being responsible. In that case, to present these things - with the establishment's own interpretation- keeps the small percentile in line. As you said, "always, with some disinfo".
I have been unraveling the "vast Jewish conspiracy" for the last two years - pounding away at both the old and new literature available; it is unsettling, particularly, when you realize the scope of what is and has been revealed. When one understands, now, the power that this establishment wields, the world over, it makes no sense that so much damning information has escaped onto the web, in the public domain, for free.
My fastidious nature demands that I must not be led down a wrong path, again, for the hundredth time, particularly, before making public comment concerning such. Otherwise, I have a hundred (or more) pages of notes that I would have been glad to share with Cluesforum - but it's too easy, this information didn't escape onto the web, without purpose.
There is a deep game being played here, my friend.
I'd be interested to read it. Why not start a thread on this forum?
In that case, to present these things - with the establishment's own interpretation- keeps the small percentile in line.
I don't think that's the reason. Belief in the disinfo tends to fall away in time if not immediately. Truth is sticky. A couple of wild guesses: The top are likely to be old men and maybe they're just getting bored; or they probably see their accomplishment as art - it is certainly impressive anyway - and what use is art unless people see it.

But, as you say, the vast majority will choose blindness so maybe TPTB know their info release is just a little experiment in a bottle, with no chance of effecting anything.

SacredCowSlayer
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by SacredCowSlayer » Fri Sep 20, 2019 1:33 am

sharpstuff » September 19th, 2019, 11:11 am wrote:Dear Flabbergasted,

An excellent piece of research most enlightening and informative. Fascinating.
. . .

Personally, I await any further developments on your work. A new thread on archaeological lines might be useful (given the 'dinosaur' thread).
I share the (above) sentiments expressed by Sharpstuff. When I read that post yesterday, I told Dani that it is worthy of a new topic.

I’ll wait (a day or two) to hear back from Flabbergasted before doing just that.

Constructive input from our membership would be appreciated.

Sincerely,

Flabbergasted
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by Flabbergasted » Fri Sep 20, 2019 3:04 pm

This is an example of the ability of an obscure little book from the 12th century to shape the philosophical and political landscape of the entire Western world. Oh wait, maybe it’s unfair to refer to it as obscure: I was at fault for having ignored its existence until last week!

I am talking about the utopian novel Ḥayy ibn Yaqẓān (“The Living Son of the Wakeful”), written in the 1170s by an Andalusian philosopher, physician and astronomer by the name Ibn Tufayl. The book (according to some, the first novel written in Arabic) was translated into Hebrew and commented in a publication from 1349 by Moses ben Joshua (Moses of Narbonne). Later, in the late 15th century, it was translated into Latin by Pico de la Mirandola, then translated into English by Edward Pococke in 1671. This is very significant, considering the role played by the respective translators: the first was a staunch advocate of rationalism and “appropriate autodidacticism” in rabbinical circles, the second dedicated his short life to grafting Hermeticism and Kabbalism onto Christianity (with the approval of the higher echelons of the Renaissance Church of Rome, despite an occasional slap on the wrist for the sake of appearances), and the third was the mentor of John Locke, whose concept of ‘tabula rasa’, clearly inspired by the novel, had an enormous influence on the development of empiricism in modern Western philosophy. Many other important European thinkers were influenced by “The Living Son of the Wakeful”, including David Hume, George Berkeley, Gottfried Leibniz, Melchisédech Thévenot, John Wallis, Christiaan Huygens, George Keith, Robert Barclay, the Quakers, Samuel Hartlib and Voltaire.
In England, philosopher and statesman Thomas More looked to Pico’s fascination with Hayy as he developed his own theories on mankind’s relationship to God, nature and society. Some have identified analogous, autodidactic themes in More’s 1516 classic “Utopia”, a political and philosophical tale of an ideal civilization, which he just so happened to set on an island, cut off from corrupting influences from the outside world. Meanwhile, England’s Francis Bacon, regarded as the father of empiricism, also conceived of a mythical island in his own utopian novel, “New Atlantis”. With an eye to both Heptaplus and Hayy, Bacon envisioned an insular society in which the religiously devout inhabitants are also devoted to the pursuit of pure, scientific knowledge. Located at the “very eye of this kingdom” is “Salomon’s House”, an institution that anticipated the modern research university, and in 1660 inspired the establishment of England’s Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge. The Society, among whose early presidents was Isaac Newton, chose as its motto a shorthand version of one of Pico’s favored, autodidactic advisos of the Roman poet Horace, “Nullius in verba.” Rough translation: “Don’t take anyone’s word for it.”
https://archive.aramcoworld.com/issue/2 ... crusoe.htm


Image
Image: same source as the quote above.

Tufayl was the personal physician of the Almoahad prince Abū Ya’qūb Yūsuf. It was Tufayl who introduced his close friend Averroes (Ibn Rushd) to the prince as his successor. Averroes, a rationalist himself, was a vocal opponent of the mystical and intuitive theology of al-Ghazāli. His classification of people into three types according to their way of assimilating truth earned him (some say, undeservedly) the reputation of dividing humanity into simple-minded people, to whom religion could be preached, and enlightened people, to whom science could be taught (hmm, where have I heard this before?). In any case, in Averroes we see the early seeds of atheistic humanism, rationalism, casuistry, gnostic elitism and relativism (although he would likely cringe at any of those labels) and this might explain why he became a household name in the West while considered a minor thinker in the Islamic spiritual economy, which at the time was awash in Sufism.

The book tells the story about Hayy who is generated ‘spontaneously’ on an island in the Indian Ocean, south of the equator. This is possible because “the island enjoys the most perfect temperature on earth and receives its light from the highest possible point in heaven”. For skeptics or for conservatives who are troubled by the absence of a Creator, the author offers an alternate backstory: a princess on a neighboring island secretly gives birth to a child and, for fear of persecution by her brother, the king, places the baby in an ark and casts it into the sea at nightfall (sound familiar?). In any case, once on the island, the boy becomes the foster child of a doe who has just lost her fawn. Eventually, the aging and death of the doe elicits existential ruminations in Hayy and, at seven years of age, he dissects his mother’s body in search of the ‘vital principle’.

Combining sensory experience and reasoning, Hayy develops the practical arts and the rudiments of empirical science. Later, as an adult, he combines reasoning with intuition to lay the foundations of metaphysics, theology and asceticism, culminating in the ‘intellectual vision of God’ (a gifted fellow, this Hayy). Interestingly, Hayy imitates the behavior of the celestial bodies, creating his own ‘astrology’: the sun’s provision of light and warmth he emulates by taking loving care of animals (until it’s time to eat them), the brightness of the stars he translates into cleanliness, perfume and pompous clothing, and the rotation of the firmament he expresses by whirling like a dervish and running around his own house, in a caricature of the circumambulation around the Kaaba.

At 50 years of age, Hayy meets another human being for the first time: Absal, a devout Muslim, lands on Hayy’s island in search of a hermit’s refuge. Absal takes Hayy (who has quickly learned to speak) back to his island which is inhabited by people of different religions. Hayy is surprised to learn that people there only access philosophical truths through images and parables. The two friends conclude that i) Hayy’s autodidactic philosophy is no different from the revealed religion of Islam, and ii) the majority of people cannot assimilate philosophical truths and are best served with religious practices. One commentator identified the book’s central argument thus: i) if not distracted by social interests or prejudice, man will naturally attain to the equivalent of neoplatonic philosophy, and ii) the practice of this philosophy will lead man to supreme happiness, which is defined as a mystical state of the soul. But life may not be as simple and romantic as that. In any case, Absal, who was raised in a society with schools and customs, never attains to Hayy’s level of contemplation.

The parallels between “The Living Son of the Wakeful”, by Ibn Tufayl, and “Robinson Crusoe” (1719), by Daniel Defoe, are difficult to dismiss as a coincidence.
Beyond the many mechanical plot similarities between Hayy and Robinson Crusoe—the cave-shelter, the animal-skin clothing, the Absal/Friday secondary character—Crusoe’s philosophical reflections deeply echo those of Hayy. Sitting on his isolated beach, gazing at the sea, Crusoe asked the same questions Hayy and all philosophers before and after have posed.
https://archive.aramcoworld.com/issue/2 ... crusoe.htm


Some similarities:
- Both propose reasoning, gradualism and the empirical method of science as a viable path to philosophical truths and technical know-how. The latter includes fishing, hunting, farming, animal husbandry, sewing, saddlery, and the ‘gradual discovery’ of fire (no idea how that works) and, time permitting, would likely also include architecture and metallurgy.
- Both defend the ability of man to live in the ‘natural state’, without society, history or tradition. I hear a faint echo of Edenic nostalgia here.
- Both believe in man’s ability to attain to the knowledge of God and obtain ‘salvation’ without the aid of institutionalized religion or formal schooling.
- Both question existing religious teachings and values, propose changes to the same, and defend religious tolerance and pacifism. While tolerance is always a virtue, Hayy’s and Crusoe’s attitudes nevertheless prefigure religious and cultural relativism and, in due time, apostasy and dissolution.
- Both triumph over nature, which gives them more time to tend to things of the mind and spirit. Being relieved of scouring the woods for food every day sounds nice, but it also sets up a dichotomy between the irksome demands of physical existence and the delights of immaterial pursuits -- a classic ‘gnostic temptation’ and a hallmark of the industrial age. Or it could be a peculiar interpretation of the Martha and Mary dilemma in Luke 10:38-42. In earlier cultures, bodily work was not seen as an impediment to self-realization, but, whenever possible, was made to reflect a larger meaning and symbolism in existence, which is why trades could serve as a trampoline for initiation in the Middle Ages. Martial arts also seek a potentially perfect union between the physical and philosophical dimensions.
- Neither Robinson Crusoe nor Hayy has the slightest sexual instinct. But what if they did?

Image
Hmm...the font chosen for the title makes “Yaqzan” look like “Tarzan”.

Like in most other things, the propositions made in “The Living Son of the Wakeful” are a complex mix of good and bad ideas. Basically, it is the promotion of ‘self-power’ over ‘other-power’, a valid spiritual perspective, though problematic when implemented outside a traditional world like that of Buddhism. On one side, the story celebrates reason, the very attribute which makes us human. On the other, it opens up the flood gates to dangerous social experiments based on the belief that humans are born a ‘tabula rasa’ or blank slate on which any ‘new man’ or ‘novel operating system’ can be written if you apply enough violence to the task.

SacredCowSlayer
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by SacredCowSlayer » Fri Sep 20, 2019 5:28 pm

Flabbergasted » September 20th, 2019, 9:53 am wrote:
sharpstuff wrote:Personally, I await any further developments on your work. A new thread on archaeological lines might be useful (given the 'dinosaur' thread).
I would be happy to add to the topic, but I figured it was too far removed from our focus on media fakery to become a thread.
Dear Flabbergasted,

As always, I appreciate your respect and consideration for CF and the scope/range of topics discussed. Since (nearly) everything we hear from the media is a reported event of some kind—which, by definition is “historic,” I think there is a proper place on this forum to try and flesh out (to the extent possible) the methods of “dating” events, structures, etc.

In my estimation, this tracks along neatly with the ground-breaking work that has been done by Simon and Team TYCHOS. We have seen time and time again how the populace at large has been deceived about history—from our hometowns all the way to the heavens.

If anyone has a proposal for a topic name, please post it here in the Chatbox. I anticipate this topic would be placed in the “Living Room.”

Flabbergasted
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by Flabbergasted » Fri Sep 20, 2019 11:06 pm

SacredCowSlayer wrote:I’m usually pretty good at coming up with topic names—but I’m a little stumped on this one.
How about "Evidence of advanced building technology in remote antiquity"?

SacredCowSlayer
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by SacredCowSlayer » Sat Sep 21, 2019 3:45 am

Flabbergasted » September 20th, 2019, 6:06 pm wrote:
SacredCowSlayer wrote:I’m usually pretty good at coming up with topic names—but I’m a little stumped on this one.
How about "Evidence of advanced building technology in remote antiquity"?
I like that. To keep it shorter, how about “Advanced Building Technology in Remote Antiquity?”

Flabbergasted
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Re: THE "CHATBOX"

Unread post by Flabbergasted » Sun Sep 22, 2019 4:03 am

SCS,
Thanks for creating a new thread for the discussion on megalithic constructions. There are several other recent posts in the Chatbox that need to be moved to the new thread, and one unrelated post (about the book "Hayy ibn Yaqzan") that should be moved back to the Chatbox.

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